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I am following a certain person on twitter. I then started following another person who is also following him. I noticed that after I did this I could see the tweets that this person was making to that person which I did not see previously.

How can I see all the tweets that people are making to a particular individual? Do I have to follow all of his followers, or is there an easier way?

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Yeah, person A's Twitter replies to person B (tweets that begin with B's @username) are only visible in the Twitter stream of those followers of A who also follow B. I think this feature is fairly non-obvious, especially for new users.

To my knowledge, the easiest way to see also the "@ replies" (without following the other user) is to go to the user's profile (at the Twitter website: http://twitter.com/username, or through some Twitter client) and see their full tweet list there. However, then you'll of course see "@ replies" to everyone, not just to the individual you were interested in. To put it otherwise: no, there isn't an easier way. To see full "conversations" in your feed, you'll have to follow both (or all) parties taking part.

Edit: damn, I think I misunderstood the question. To see all tweets, from anyone, directed to a certain user, you can simply search for "@username". For example, try https://twitter.com/search?q=%40codinghorror to see all replies to Jeff Atwood.

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Searches, in turn, can be saved both on Twitter website and in many clients (e.g. you can create columns out of searches in TweetDeck), so you can quickly return to them later. –  Jonik Dec 29 '10 at 22:12
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