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In Gmail, I have a number of accounts that I can choose to send from. (Old e-mail address, one used just for gaming, one for my blog, etc.)

How can I have a unique signature for each depending on which I choose?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Google just released Rich Text signatures, which also includes the ability to have a unique signature for each From address.

http://gmailblog.blogspot.com/2010/07/rich-text-signatures.html

(I'm not seeing it yet, so I guess it's still rolling out.)

Update: After logging out and logging back in I'm now seeing the new setting. This is exactly what I wanted.

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Just go to Gmail settings. mail.google.com/mail/#settings –  Jan B. Kjeldsen Jul 9 '10 at 8:20
    
There for me, just used settings link in top right, a little over half-way down the General tab is an ugly blue box for it. –  Peter Boughton Jul 9 '10 at 9:00
    
I was able to see it after logging out and logging back in again. –  Al E. Jul 9 '10 at 12:01
    
Just out of curiosity, did you know the answer when you posted the question? –  Evan Carroll Jul 9 '10 at 15:57
    
Nope. Had no idea it was coming. –  Al E. Jul 9 '10 at 17:04

Have you looked at canned responses;

http://gmailblog.blogspot.com/2008/10/new-in-labs-canned-responses.html

These can be used along with filters.

Hope this helps.

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Check out WiseStamp extension for Firefox and Chrome.

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  OnenOnlyWalter Feb 4 '13 at 21:45

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