Take the 2-minute tour ×
Web Applications Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for power users of web applications. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My friends say that they are notified when I like a post on Facebook. I don't want this. What is the privacy option that can help me?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The privacy of your like is dependent on the privacy of your friend's post. if they only share the post with you, then you liking it will only appear in your friend's activity feed/newsfeed.

If they share it with a group of friends it will appear only in that group of friends' activity feed/newsfeed.

If they share it publicly. It will end up in all your friend's activity feed/news feed

share|improve this answer
add comment

There is an option for this, but unfortunately you cannot set it; it must be set by your friends who do not want to see your comments and likes. If you comment on or like a post that they can view, then your comment or like may appear in their News Feed unless they turn those off. To do that they can hover their pointer over your name or go to your profile/timeline, then move to the Subscribed button, and uncheck "Comments and Likes".

enter image description here

Of course, they will still see your comments and likes on posts that they would see anyway in their News Feed, just not a separate story about them.

share|improve this answer
    
Note: Facebook has now changed this menu a bit. Now under "Friends" go to "Settings..." and then you'll see the menu containing "Comments and Likes". –  mark4o Mar 31 '12 at 18:05
    
Unfortunately, this feature is not working for a lot of people (including me): facebook.com/help/community/question/… –  Fuhrmanator Aug 16 '12 at 1:08
    
I am seeing the same issue. Since the option to unsubscribe from comments and likes is still in the menu, I assume it was not broken intentionally and will get fixed at some point. –  mark4o Aug 16 '12 at 3:35
add comment

There could be no privacy setting that could help you - when we "like" something, we are actively making a public statement about something. If we don't want people to know we like something, we don't publish it on the web (i.e. don't touch that "like" button).

Otherwise mark4o has the best answer: if your friends don't want to receive news about your "likes" then have to follow his instructions.

share|improve this answer
3  
I appreciate your opinion Alex in Paris but I beg to differ. If you do like a picture of a friend, you should be able to tell him that by clicking the like button. If someone clicks on his picture and sees my name under the picture, that's fine. Nevertheless, I strongly believe that I should be able to decide myself, whether or not I want everyone in my friends list to be immediately informed that I just hit the like button to a photo of a person that they don't even know. Also they can immediately see the picture that I liked on their news feed eventhough they wouldn't have access to his pict –  user20286 May 20 '12 at 15:21
    
eventhough they wouldn't have access to his pictures if they would click on his profile. This creates many situations with conflict potential. –  user20286 May 20 '12 at 15:21
    
I agree with T. Tree. Sometimes our friends also send friend request to those whom they don't know. This is not good. Hence there should be some privacy setting in facebook for post regarding liking. –  user20649 May 31 '12 at 7:01
    
Remember, you're not paying (money) for the service. Your "likes" are exactly what has value to Facebook. It's what is supposed to help in targeting advertisements. See more: philly.com/philly/news/… –  Fuhrmanator Aug 16 '12 at 1:15
add comment

protected by Community May 31 '12 at 16:09

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.