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Well, it's a long time I'm using my Gmail account. Today, I had a talk with my friends about the date we created our Gmail accounts and we all had some guesses about it. Is there any option in Gmail info/settings where I can see the date I created my account?

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1  
All answers given, refer to arrival date. This doesn't really tell whether the account was created on that date. –  Jacob Jan Tuinstra Dec 25 '12 at 22:09
    
You could try searching for the email with the invitation to join Gmail, if you did’t deleted it. –  Alex Dec 26 '12 at 7:49
    
@JacobJanTuinstra Gmail, like most email systems, sends you a welcome email as part of the account creation process. If you didn't delete it, that will be the first message in your account with the "all mail" label. –  mhoran_psprep Dec 26 '12 at 12:28
    
I understand your reasoning, but it is all circumstantial. My answer (www.labnol.org) gives the creation date, regardless of any circumstance. –  Jacob Jan Tuinstra Dec 26 '12 at 12:41

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. Go to SettingsForwarding and POP/IMAP
  2. See the POP download:1. Status: POP is enabled for all mail that has arrived since xx/xx/xx
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I just checked and there's nothing to see. What if you don't have POP enabled? –  Jacob Jan Tuinstra Dec 25 '12 at 11:38
    
If you don't have the POP3 activated, then enable it and save settings. Afterwards, return to settings again. Then you will see what @Sahil is describing. –  Jacob Jan Tuinstra Dec 25 '12 at 11:46
    
Even if you disabled POP, you can just re-enable it temporarily to find the date. Just select Enable POP for all mail including those already downloaded. –  Sahil Mittal Dec 25 '12 at 11:46
    
Good answer sahil. Is this the date you've created the gmail or the date you have received your first mail? Anyway, gmail sends every user the first email to welcome, so both dates must be same! –  Manoochehr Dec 26 '12 at 5:57
    
yes exactly, they are same ! –  Sahil Mittal Dec 26 '12 at 6:04

Ways have changed over years, so there is the one working now.

  1. Go to Google Takout
  2. Sign in with your account
  3. Click "Create an archive" (located in top right corner)
  4. Scroll down to "Google+ Circles"
  5. Click "Edit"
  6. Click "Transfer your Google+ connections to another account"
  7. On that page you'll find creation date of your Google account
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Confirmed. This seems to be the best way at the moment. –  Rev1.0 Jul 25 at 7:43
from:google.com

Go to search in your Gmail and type from:google.com. This returns the invitation email sent by Google the day you created your account (if you haven’t deleted that message already).

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This is already mentioned in the comments to the question. –  Vidar S. Ramdal Nov 8 '13 at 10:11

This is the only conclusive answer there is to give about this topic:

  1. Go to google.com/takeout and sign-in with your current Google Account.
  2. Now click the link that says “Transfer your Google+ connections to another account”
  3. Google will once again require your account password. Sign-in and on the next screen you’ll see you Google Account creation

With reference to this article: Find the Creation Date of your Google Account

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What if you had a Google account before you signed up for Gmail? –  Al E. Dec 26 '12 at 16:01
    
The OP's question concerns Gmail. How does this relate to a Google account? Do you mean Google Apps? –  Jacob Jan Tuinstra Dec 26 '12 at 21:04
    
@AlEverett: see comment..... –  Jacob Jan Tuinstra Dec 26 '12 at 21:34

This is a hack of @mhoran_psprep's answer. Just visit the following URL -

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?shva=1#all/p9999

Well, it's a safe guess that you don't have more than 999900 mails. Gmail will redirect you to the last page of your inbox, which will have the first 50 emails you ever received.

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It didn't work, Did you suppose that I've not moved my mails to different folders? I mean I have a few mails in my inbox and all the other mails are in their related folder. Also I remember I've removed my first mail which I received from gmail :D –  Manoochehr Dec 26 '12 at 5:58
    
Possible. It only searches inside Inbox(you can see it in the url). Try searching inside the "All Mails" folder with this url mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?shva=1#all/p9999. This will search all your emails including all labels, not only inbox. –  Bibhas Dec 26 '12 at 7:08
    
+1 it goes to last page of the inbox –  ajduke Jan 1 '13 at 7:15

the method is very simple:

  1. open Gmail
  2. click on "all mail"
  3. the message in the upper right hand corner of the window will say "1-100 of xx,xxx"
  4. divide xx,xxx by 100 and round up. That is the last page number (Y)
  5. change the url by adding /pY so it reads .../..#all/pY
  6. My first message is from 3/18/2005 and has the subject "Gmail is different. Here's what you need to know"
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Did you suppose that I've not moved my mails to different folders? I mean I have a few mails in my inbox and all the other mails are in their related folder. –  Manoochehr Dec 26 '12 at 5:56
    
The "all mail" label shows all the mail, no matter what label if any was attached to a message. Gmail, like most email systems, sends you a welcome email as part of the account creation process. –  mhoran_psprep Dec 26 '12 at 12:26
    
I deleted that mail the day I created the account on gmail. –  Sahil Mittal Dec 26 '12 at 15:55
    
I imported a lot of email messages from old email systems. I have a significant amount of email that pre-dates the creation of Gmail. This method is not reliable. Certainly that welcome message, if it exists in my mailbox, is not on the last page of "All Mail". –  Al E. Dec 26 '12 at 16:00

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