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How do you send a HTML email in Outlook Web Access?

I have the HTML written but if i just copy and paste it, it will just send as plain text. I have no idea how to do it. Is it possible?

Screen Shot of new Email window

Email:

<html lang="en">

  <head>
    <style> body {
     font-family: Georgia, "Times New Roman",
          Times, serif;
    font-size: 20px;
     text-align:justify;
     color: #CFB52B;
     background:#000000;
     background-attachment:scroll }</style>
    </head>

   <body>
<table border= "0" align="center" style=" width:500px;">
    <tr style="height:550px; width:200px;">

        <td bstyle="width:550px" style="text-align:top; vertical-align:top;">
            <div align="center">
                    <img src="EngLOGO.jpg" alt="IMAGE LOADING" height="350px" border="0">
            </div>

            <p style="text-align:justify;">Hi All<br /><br /></p>
            <p style="text-align:justify; line-height:26px">

            Thanks<br />BOB<br />

            <br /></p>

        </td>
    </tr>
</table>
  </body>
</html>
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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jan 16 '13 at 6:05

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

    
Have you seen this Serverfault question? –  Alex Jan 16 '13 at 15:52
    
I don't know but I'd be surprised if OWA lets you use the email editor window as an HTML editing window. I'd guess that it lets you do WSYWIG editing which is either serialized to plain text or serialized to HTML. To do otherwise would put OWA at a huge risk for XSS attacks. –  MatthewMartin Mar 17 '13 at 21:09

1 Answer 1

Can you put the html into a file (test.html), view it with a browser (so that the HTML renders), copy the contents and then paste them into the compose window?

I haven't tried this, and don't know if there may be any issues with Outlook-web styles vs the style-declaration in the HTML.

But logically it's the first approach to test.

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