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Recently I'm trying Trello to orgnize my project with friends, I'm happy that it support markdown, because I'm also using it to write my blog and all other docs.

But now I notice that, when I input

Hello
world

in my trello card description, the output is supposed to be

Hello world

but actually it's

Hello
world

it's a little weird, because I have to keeping in mind that Trello is in a different markdown format, especially I'm used to click enter with few words in normal markdown format.

But then I do some search, in Q&A it's explained that it's supporting markdown line breaking.... what is the truth?!!!

PS: I'm using Chrome in Win 7 and apple, also debian.

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1 Answer 1

Yes, Trello uses a slightly different variant of markdown than StackExchange and doesn't have a live preview which makes it trickier to see what you're inputting.

The main difference appears to be (as you've pointed out) in line breaks:

  • A carriage return in SE doesn't create a new line, in Trello it does.
  • A carriage return and two spaces are required to create anew line in SE, the extra spaces have no effect in Trello.
  • Two carriage returns in SE will create a new paragraph (a new line with a blank line before it), this is the same as Trello.

I know SE uses WMD markdown for ASP.NET, Trello uses Backbone.js and therefore Node.js, perhaps this is where the difference arises.

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The difference was actually due to user confusion, not implementation. We used to be consistent with the markdown spec, but explaining markdown to nontechnical users who couldn't understand why their line breaks were being ignored was not worth it, so we switched to this custom dialect. –  Ian Henry Jan 31 '13 at 20:51

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