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When you download a file from the MEGA service, you are shown a pretty download progress bar within the browser. Once this progress bar reaches 100%, your browser then begins to download the file. That is, only once the graphical download is complete, your browser's normal download process is started. What exactly is going on here?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 27 down vote accepted

It uses the fileSystem API, which basically writes the file to a sandboxed section of your local file system:

AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default\File System\

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Ah interesting. So the graphical download creates the file in the directory mentioned in your answer. The start of the browser download is the movement from that directory to your download destination folder. Is that right? What are the benefits to this? –  Jeff Mar 4 '13 at 20:03
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Yes, exactly... Well, it seems to copy, not move the file. As for the benefits, i'm struggling to see any! "Resumable" downloads is one, but not being able to choose your download folder isn't ideal. I'm also struggling to find out how long the file is stored in your User Data folder, as i downloaded something from mega about 3 days ago and the 250mb file is still there. –  Dodswm Mar 5 '13 at 19:41
    
on linux, I found the file here: "$HOME/.config/chromium/Default/File System/001/t/00/00000006" I compared it to the real file downloaded and it is identical; I wonder if I can just safely delete it as it is now useless and ocuppy 160MB? –  Aquarius Power Sep 24 '13 at 2:38
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protected by Community Aug 7 '13 at 0:06

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