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I worked for a company and used an e-mail account which this company created on Google for me. This means that the director of this company doesn't have my password, but still, as the one who created the account, he is still able to remove the account (and maybe even reset the password).

I may be forced to sue this company, since they refuse to pay their bills, but without e-mails on Google servers, I won't be able to prove that the work was actually requested and that the company agreed the terms and conditions. This means that the director may be interested in removing the account in order to destroy the evidence.

How do I:

  • Either block the account in a way to prevent its creator to reset the password and/or remove the account itself, destroying the evidence,

  • Or clone every e-mail, both received and send, on another Gmail account in a way that it would still be a valid legal proof?

Note: just downloading e-mails through POP/IMAP won't help, since it won't be a legal proof, because I could have altered the contents of the e-mails after downloading them from Google servers.

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2 Answers

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It looks like that it is someone else who own the account. So basically you cannot do anything.

You can try hacking the account which is out of scope for this website or else if by any way it is possible that you contact Google. Do you have influence enough to contact Google? Is the case big enough that your country contacts Google?

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I'm not aware of how they could remove the account without knowing the password, but you might try turning on 2-step verification for the account. This would add an additional layer of protection to the account. I would personally go through every security procedure that Google has made available and turn them all on at their highest settings.

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