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I searched DuckDuckGo for site:wikipedia.org "advisary", hoping to spot some typos.

To my surprise, DuckDuckGo replied with articles that do not contain the word "advisary", even thought I took the pain to put it inside quotes.

I notice that this behavior only occurs in conjunction with the usage of the site: keyword.

How to search for an exact string within a domain with DuckDuckGo?

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I have tested and it also occurs if you add a space at the end of the exact string: –  Tom Horwood Oct 3 '13 at 4:18
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...the exact string: "advisary ". I have submitted a bug report at dukgo.com –  Tom Horwood Oct 3 '13 at 4:29
    
@TomHorwood: Thanks a lot! Could you tell us the URL of the bug report? –  nic Oct 3 '13 at 7:48
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This help page explains the situation best:

Our intention is to not auto-correct searches. That is, we intend to completely respect the query you type in, and (in some cases) display a 'Did you mean?' link at the top when relevant.

However, there are a few outstanding major bugs in this area that we are working to resolve. As a result, you may see some auto-correct behavior in the search results.

Unfortunately, these bugs involve a bunch of APIs that are mostly out of our control. We are both working around these bugs and also working to get them fixed .

For some queries, it has been a little slow to resolve, but rest assured that this is a top priority. In any case, specific examples always help as we may be able to easily add more workarounds.

(Thanks for the specific example!)

I'm David from the DuckDuckGo team - if you want proof, e-mail me at david (at sign) duckduckgo.com.

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