Web Applications Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for power users of web applications. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

For security reasons we'd like to see all documents in Google Drive which are shared with people outside the organization (Google Apps users). Is this possible? I know you can search for "to:[email]" but this requires knowing the exact email, we want "to:[non apps user]".

share|improve this question
    
Good question. Too bad it hasn't been answered yet. I've love to know how to view a list of Google Drive items which are shared with the public or shared outside of the Google Apps organization? Can Google Drive users easily search for items which have a sharing setting like "Public on the Web" or "Anyone with the link". – Stefan Lasiewski Jan 15 at 1:43
up vote 6 down vote accepted
+50

Google Apps does not natively support reporting on who has access to what in Google Drive. The report you are looking for is possible through a Google Apps script.

As you probably know, from the Reports section of your Google Apps admin panel, you will be able to tell how many files are externally visible.

If you are on the Google Apps Unlimited or Google Apps for Education license, you will have access to a Drive audit log, from which you may be able to generate a report based on sharing events. This could be cumbersome.

If you have a $30 to $40 USD budget, you can either procure the Drive Audit Google Sheet Add-on or the Drive Privacy script from tech blogger Amit Agarwal and produce the report.

Drive Privacy script screenshot

A free option based on Stefan Lasiewski's suggestion below is to try whohasaccess.com. The app requires View and manage the files in your Google Drive permissions, among other simpler permissions.

share|improve this answer
1  
There is also whohasaccess.com . The app requires View and manage the files in your Google Drive permissions, among other simpler permissions. Also see lifehacker.com/… – Stefan Lasiewski Jan 19 at 18:42
2  
Just updated the answer. Thanks. – rahi Jan 19 at 21:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.