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In the past, I could add any email address that I own via Settings → Accounts → Add another email address you own. I document this on my blog. On that wzard, there were 2 options:

Gmail Add Email Wizard, Page 2

But now it only lets you specify the SMTP server directly and it doesn't accept the standard settings of smtp.gmail.com

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Did they change policies? Or am I missing something here? I tried this on two different accounts.

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marked as duplicate by Al E., Eight Days of Malaise, Alex, John C, jonsca Dec 18 at 2:21

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The interesting part is that they still don't support separate single-purpose-only passwords for smtp at gmail.com themselves (unless you go into a separate and non-related two-factor auth), so, if this policy of theirs were to be implemented by example.su, requiring the smtp password of gmail.com, and giving access to the whole Google Account of the user, just for smtp, how would they feel? Really bad move, Google. Or at least they could start letting people have single-purpose-only passwords, like for outgoing mail only. –  cnst Dec 16 at 21:16
    
yeah, I think we're talking about the same thing. –  Chris Beck Dec 18 at 0:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Google is getting out of the business of sending email using domains that it does not administer, because it stands in the way of implementing rules that reduce spoofed email, such as DMARC. This also has the side effect of encouraging customers to host their email domains with Google.

Google is grandfathering existing email adddress configurations, but they are not allowing new email addresses to be added.

Yahoo did something similar when they activated DMARC enforcement. This made it harder to send email from mailing lists claiming to come from @yahoo.com, @aol.com, etc. . AOL soon followed suit. See this PCWorld article for more on the fallout and reasoning.

Update: There was no formal Google announcement about this policy change, but this support thread has an answer from a Google employee.

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Very interesting. Are there any official postings from Gmail to this effect. I found support.google.com/a/answer/2466580?hl=en but none that explicity connect the dots between my question and Gmail's DMARC policy. –  Chris Beck Sep 2 at 23:45
    
In Gmail's case, the change isn't directly about DMARC, but rather a way to avoid violating other domains' DMARC policies. I'm still searching for the original announcement, but setup requirements have changed here: support.google.com/mail/answer/22370?hl=en –  Royce Williams Sep 3 at 4:22
    
Concur. Here is a thread (see wdurham's Aug 7 explanation) of some other puzzled users trying to make sense of this change. productforums.google.com/forum/#!topic/gmail/QNMgV2r5X4A –  Chris Beck Sep 3 at 4:38

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