Hot answers tagged

24

Rename your file to something like example.exe_ and try again.


21

Ironically, the Gmail client for Android displays them beautifully. So if you have an Android phone, just open the email there—and you don't even have to forward it. ;)


20

This is a known issue with all of Google's services. They do not support the .eml or the less common .mht, both of which are known and established formats. In this case it has been (for years now) one area that all the others (Microsoft, Apple, Mozilla, and most of the rest of the community) are ahead of Google on. The only option, aside from convincing ...


16

The way I do this is to click the Forward option and then type in a new Subject and clear the message text so I have an new message but with the attachments in place. I'd be surprised if there's a quicker way than this; entering a new Subject doesn't take that long.


13

has:attachment — show mails which have an attachment filename:xyz — search for attachments based on type or name


11

After some googling this is the best answer I can give you Click on "Options" then click on "Show original": The view source of the new window and then save that to a file that you can then attach readnotify send as attachement (gmail)


10

Most if not all of the methods for sending large files work for this as well, especially if the recipient is not too tech-savy, as it doesn't require renaming a file extension or downloading an alternate archive application.


8

If you get an email with a Word (.doc), Powerpoint or PDF attachment then there are two links next to it, 'View' and 'Download'. When you click on 'View' the document is opened by Google Docs and there is a link at the top to allow you to 'Save in Google Docs' Excel attachments give you three options, 'View at HTML' ,'Open as a Google spreadsheet' and ...


8

No, sending an email with a Google Doc and selecting "Send without sharing" does not add it as a regular attachment. The recipient will still get the same email, with a link to the Doc you sent. When clicked, the user will see the page that says "You must request permission to view this document" The best use of this feature that I can think of is to set ...


7

No, "download and add to GDrive" copies the file between Google servers without downloading it to your computer. That's why it's built in to Gmail. You can download the file to your Dropbox folder on your computer. (You could save steps by putting a Dropbox-folder shortcut where your "Save" dialog can use it. This varies by your desktop OS.) But you still ...


6

Zip it up using Winrar or 7zip. Gmail understands .zip format but not .rar and .7z.


6

Yes, business and education accounts as well, have the same attachment limit of 25MB. See here: http://www.google.com/support/a/bin/answer.py?answer=175121


6

I've found no solution yet, but I found it's faster using drag & drop to download the images. If the images would have been added as attachments, the option to download them all at once would appear. More info here: http://googlesystem.blogspot.com.es/2013/03/attach-images-in-new-gmail-compose.html


6

Create a self-extracting archive with 7-Zip, make sure it is password protected and the file names are encrypted: Google will not detect the exe inside and let it through. The recipient has just to know the password (don’t send that with Gmail :)).


4

You can now use Gmail's "Save to Drive" option, and then load the file in the other email from the Drive. This can be faster and more efficient than downloading the file and re-uploading it from your computer. If the user doesn't have access to the file, Gmail will prompt you to "share and send" when you send the email.


4

Most likely uploaded to the server, since that is the slowest operation. Any special encoding done to the file probably takes fractions of a second on Google's beefy mail servers. Either way it is probably not wise to try to interrupt it if you want your file attached.


4

I'm afraid you can't. Looking at Gmail help, there's nothing related to searching within attachments. You can specify a file name, but that's it: filename:physicshomework.txt Or you could save files you want to search through to Google Docs. The simple explanation why it's not possible is that it would require a tremendous amount of indexing to be ...


4

Or you can right click on the download and "save link as" and save it as .mht and open in IE. I have tried to open in Chrome and Firefox but they dont like it either.


4

My work-around to downloading all pictures of a embedded email in Gmail is to: open email with embedded images, make sure all images shown In your internet browser goto File menu and then use the "Save Page As" option. (I use Firefox, but should work for other internet browsers.) set a destination for your page and save all files, including pictures for ...


4

Scroll to the bottom of the message and press the Forward button. Each embedded attachment will now appear as a link with the option to delete (x). If you click on the name of the image it will download. This procedure saved a file size of 2,354,359 bytes (2.4 MB on disk) with embedded camera meta data (Camera type and settings). For the same images ...


4

Here is what worked for me: "Add" your .exe file to a (new) encrypted .zip file (the "inner file".) Change the file extension from .zip to .zipx. (Of course, other extensions probably work. You could even make the extension .thepasswordisHuckleberry!) "Add" the .zipx file to a (new) unencrypted .zip file (the "outer file".) E-mail the outer (.zip) file ...


4

Gmail actually allows sending .exe files. And you don't need to do anything outside of Gmail. Instead of clicking on the clipper icon(attachment) you click on triangle icon next to it (Google Drive icon). Thats it - from there its more or less the same procedure. Gmail does not allow .exe attachments but in the same time offers an option to add/attach ...


4

DriveApp.getFilesByName() returns a file iterator. You therefore need to slightly modify the sendMail() arguments. MailApp.sendEmail(emailAddress, subject, message, {attachments: file.next().getBlob()} );


3

No, you can't rename an attachment after you uploaded it. You need to detach the file, rename it and upload it again. Also note that GMail can sometimes renames your attachments. Here's an useful quote from the official documentation: Some attachments that include non-English characters in the filename may be renamed 'Gmail,' or the name may be ...


3

No ... detach the file, rename it, and attach it again. Good file naming schemes and discipline in following them will pay off in the long run.


3

New copies are created once the email is sent. The file(s) only exists on the server until the email is actually sent. That's why you can get bounceback messages because an email is too large in size from recipients. The attachments are actually embedded within the email itself when it's sent (and forwarded).


3

Changing file extension is OK as long as it is like *.zip1 or *.cnvrt. But, we should never change it to *.png or *.doc because the recipient might have known extension hidden (under Folder Options) and downloaded file will be associated with default application. If s/he is not tech-savvy, you might have to put extra effort to tell the person to turn that ...


3

If the attachment is document that opens in Google docs, you can open it and email it from Google docs to new address. This bypasses transfer to desktop and re-upload.



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