New answers tagged

0

There's a Slack integration for that: MailClark. It includes a Group mode, which does exactly what you describe. You can have a Slack channel with any combination of Slack and email users, where Slack messages are sent out as emails, and emails are received as Slack messages.


2

I figured it out. I was downloading AMAZON_SES_SETUP_NOTIFICATION using the public URL, but the bucket policies didn't allow downloading via that URL, so it was giving the AccessDenied message. Meaning, I wasn't authorized to download that file from the S3 bucket using the public URL. Instead, if I double-clicked on the file from within the S3 console then ...


2

No, Google Apps does not include a mass mailing or marketing tool. Google Apps accounts are subject to both sending and receiving limits. If you can stay within these limits you, or a 3rd party, could build a tool using Apps Script, Gmail, and Sheets in Google Apps. When paying for some of the other services you mentioned you are also getting their ...


0

From Administrative APIs - Google Apps Administrator Help Google Apps administrators have access to Google Apps Administrative APIs. These APIs allow you to collaborate with the Google Apps services using your existing infrastructure. There are a number of administrator and application APIs that can be integrated with Google Apps and the ...


2

No, not really. There's no setting within Gmail that would let you turn off retrieval of new mail while you have a network connection. I can think of a couple of workarounds that could get you close to what you're after. Use the Gmail Offline Chrome extension. It offers a slightly simplified view of your Gmail mailbox. It occasionally polls Gmail in the ...


0

If the message wasn't received by Google's servers, there is no way it can be delivered to your consumer Gmail account. Start by using the email log search within your Google Apps account to find additional details on what happened to these 'missing' messages. About Email Log Search Find messages with Email Log Search An alternative method that avoids ...


1

First step: Make sure you aren't sending actual spam. I recommend reviewing this wiki article on the USA's "CAN-SPAM Act of 2003". Even if you aren't in the US, Google is and must abide by US law. PTR and reverse DNS lookups are outdated and I highly doubt Google uses them. These applied when a company used one server to send and receive mail. In the ...


0

While SPF and DKIM are important first steps, I would recommend you now implement DMARC. - A checklist on how to deploy DMARC can be found here. - Additional articles and videos describing DMARC can be found here. The TL;DR is - SPF & DKIM provide basics ways of allowing a receiving mail system of knowing if the sending server is approved to send on ...


0

@Adeel - If it's a configuration issue, this Mail Tester will point it out. If it's not a configuration issue and you follow their Guidelines then it's either a content issue with google or they got your IP and/or DOMAIN flagged in their system and they only way to get out of it will be to have users constantly click the "Not Spam" on your messages and add ...


2

Apart from all the steps that were mentioned in that answer, you have to take care of another thing. Email providers like "Gmail" use "Spamhaus" to gather information about malicious websites and domains. You need to make sure your domain name is not listed on Spamhaus. If your domain is listed, all emails originating from your domain will always go to spam ...



Top 50 recent answers are included