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17

Git has a separate concept of the author (the person who wrote the code) and committer (the person who committed it to the repository). Similarly there can be different dates for both. They are usually the same. You'd want them to be different primarily if the person writing the code or submitting the patch does not have push access to the repository as ...


15

According to the GitHub Terms of Service, under section G. General Conditions, you'll find this: You may use GitHub subdomains (e.g., yourname.github.io) solely as permitted and intended by the GitHub Pages tool to host your company pages, personal pages, or open source project pages, and for no other purpose. You may not use GitHub subdomains in ...


8

Your GitHub account password and SSH key(s) used to connect with repos hosted on GitHub are two different set of credentials. You can change one without affecting the other.


7

You can exclude search results on GitHub using a minus sign. So to search for all issues not labelled as bugs, you could put the following into a search: type:issue -label:bug Source.


6

This looks like a mix between how Git works with dates and how it was referenced with GitHub's closing keywords. Git separates between commit and author dates. In Pro Git they go a bit into the difference: The author is the person who originally wrote the work, whereas the committer is the person who last applied the work. So, if you send in a patch to ...


5

You only really need to add .atom to the end of most branch views to get the corresponding RSS feed of its commits. https://github.com/{username}/{repo}/commits/master.atom The above will show the RSS feed for commits against the master branch. If you wanted to see commits for another branch, change accordingly: ...


5

The best way to solve this problem is to set up a second account for your work. That's the most secure way. It's better if everything is strictly seperated.


5

The GitHub robots.txt does explicitly disallow crawling of the wiki pages, for example in the Googlebot section: User-agent: Googlebot Allow: /*/*/tree/master Allow: /*/*/blob/master ... Disallow: /*/*/wiki/*/* As this is the site-wide robots file, there isn't any getting around it. It is an interesting choice, since GitHub describes wikis as a place to ...


4

Go to Github, select any project at random, and start clicking links until you get to a source file that is displayed directly in the browser. Conclusion: it is possible for your email address in a source file posted to Github to be picked up by a bot. Whether it's likely or not is another story. Note that the authors of jQuery UI are not squeamish ...


4

For your second app you are wanting to publish, create a new repo using any name (e.g. myapp). Then publish a branch named gh-pages to that repo. Your new app should then be available at http://USER.github.io/REPO. So, for our example, username.github.io/myapp. For a detailed guide on these steps, see the Creating Project Pages Manually guide. The ...


4

I have not tried this but here seems to say your answer is No/Yes in that order:


4

According to GitHub's robots.txt, the only section Google is allowed to index is the master branch of a project, so your account will only be indexed if you have one of those in your project (and it isn't private). If you have a master branch then it could just be that Google hasn't gotten to you yet. You can try submitting your URL which might speed ...


3

Go to the Watched repositories page that shows all the repos you are watching. Account Settings (Tools icon in upper right) → Notification center → Watching On the right sidebar you'll see this: ☑ Automatically watch When you’re given push access to a repository, automatically receive notifications for it. If you uncheck or untick that box ...


3

This is what they say officially: Popular repositories This lists your repositories with the most stars and watchers. Go you! But looking it over, the listing order/precedence comes out as: All repositories created by you All repositories you've forked Then it counts the contributors, stars and watchers in that order, on each of those to see ...


3

Almost. You can search for Android apps based on the fact that they all contain an AndroidManifest.xml file in the repository. Part of that XML will include some fragment of code similar to: <uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="8" /> So you need to search that, like so: "android:minSdkVersion" extension:xml This will only bring up the files that ...


3

Service There is some basic Github/Twitter integration in standard Github Services. Go to repository settings. Select Webhooks/Services from menu on left. There using Add Service drop-list button you can add Twitter service. Configuration is minimal, and twit is created for almost every commit, but it might be just enoug. And there is similar thing for ...


2

Check out the repository and look for their email address in the Git log.


2

It's gonna be easier. Go to the Forked Repo (yours) and just click green button. It will show you "switching base" message button. click it. Now it will automatically lead to your original repo. write some commit message and Click Create Pull Request button. Now it will lead to your forked repo automatically, click Merge pull request and Confirm ...


2

There are several possibilities: You have not pushed your commits up to Github. Unlike centralized version control systems, committing it git is done locally. When you have made commit(s) locally and want to synchronize your Github project page, you need to run 'git push' to send the commits upstream. Your commits were not on the master branch of a ...


2

Actually you can search for issues across repositories by including the author:$author. Here is an example that searches for all issues created by me across all repos.


2

When posting to Twitter, Google+ or Facebook, the only logo that will come through is the image attached to the owner or organisation that owns the repository. As such, to edit what that logo is, you will have to update the linked Gravatar image attached to the email on that owner or organisation account. You could add an image to the repo itself, but ...


2

On each user profile it will only show the commit chart and description for the last 15 recently active repositories. Those outside the top 15 will not show that information. It probably has something to do with performance, and GitHub chose 15 repos as the cut-off point.


2

That is done by using a code block with the "diff" syntax. The raw markdown would look something like this: One small step for ```diff -man +humankind ``` I've made a gist also that demonstrates the code (click "Raw" to view the markdown).


2

My team ran into similar problems: a bug tracking system is great for logging all bugs and new functionality to be built, but we needed something more to help us prioritize and work together. The process we developed and that works really well for us is a combination of a bug tracker (BugZilla in our case) and Trello. Trello is a superb piece of web software ...


2

Click on the arrow at the upper left of the screen. Click Configure Integrations Click on Github Choose the channel you want news to be posted to Authentify Select the repository and branch to get news from Select the type of news you want Click Save integration


2

There is currently no way via the GitHub web interface to see the diff between any two points of your gist revisions. The alternative is to download the Gist and then reupload it to your main GitHub account as a full repository and then modify the URL as needed, like the following: ...


2

Pretty much the opposite of this question. Since the only part of the repository that GitHub's robots.txt permits search engines to crawl is the master branch, if you remove or rename that then your repository won't be crawled. If you don't want that, the only other options are to not use GitHub or pay for an account which lets you have private ...


2

The question you linked shows a way to upload text files. Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be a way to upload binary files. Zapier seems to provide ways to upload files (via pull requests) from third party web-apps like Dropbox, Google Drive, … to Github. For Dropbox I found this: Dropbox New File in Directory to Github Create Pull Request GitHub Pull ...



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