Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Git has a separate concept of the author (the person who wrote the code) and committer (the person who committed it to the repository). Similarly there can be different dates for both. They are usually the same. You'd want them to be different primarily if the person writing the code or submitting the patch does not have push access to the repository as ...


8

Your GitHub account password and SSH key(s) used to connect with repos hosted on GitHub are two different set of credentials. You can change one without affecting the other.


7

The GitHub robots.txt does explicitly disallow crawling of the wiki pages, for example in the Googlebot section: User-agent: Googlebot Allow: /*/*/tree/master Allow: /*/*/blob/master ... Disallow: /*/*/wiki/*/* As this is the site-wide robots file, there isn't any getting around it. It is an interesting choice, since GitHub describes wikis as a place to ...


6

This looks like a mix between how Git works with dates and how it was referenced with GitHub's closing keywords. Git separates between commit and author dates. In Pro Git they go a bit into the difference: The author is the person who originally wrote the work, whereas the committer is the person who last applied the work. So, if you send in a patch to ...


5

The best way to solve this problem is to set up a second account for your work. That's the most secure way. It's better if everything is strictly seperated.


3

If GitHub won't show you the network graph because there are too many forks, try the Members tab instead. You may still get the following warning: Woah, this network is huge! We're showing only some of this network's repositories. but at least you'll be able to see some of the forks.


3

Pretty much the opposite of this question. Since the only part of the repository that GitHub's robots.txt permits search engines to crawl is the master branch, if you remove or rename that then your repository won't be crawled. If you don't want that, the only other options are to not use GitHub or pay for an account which lets you have private ...


3

Service There is some basic Github/Twitter integration in standard Github Services. Go to repository settings. Select Webhooks/Services from menu on left. There using Add Service drop-list button you can add Twitter service. Configuration is minimal, and twit is created for almost every commit, but it might be just enoug. And there is similar thing for ...


3

If users are active on GitHub, you might be able to catch their email address from a commit log or open up an issue on a project they are working on. If they are inactive however and don't have a visible email or repository there doesn't seem to be a direct way. I came up with this workaround that might be worth a try in extreme cases: create an empty ...


3

Your question mentions "code samples" and a "read-only" way to share the code. What about uploading only the most relevant excerpts of your code? You could even use Gists: Gists are a great way to share your work. You can share single files, parts of files, or full applications. You can access gists at https://gist.github.com. ... Secret gists ...


3

READMEs are very important to GitHub repos, and you've used yours well so I would recommend against adding those files to your .gitignore. Instead, I would recommend using GitHub releases and provide the "clean" zip file there. You could also use your README to point to the latest release download link when you get that set up.


2

Use Google Docs viewer with a url like: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=${link_to_raw_pdf} e.g. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://raw.githubusercontent.com/degoes-consulting/lambdaconf-2015/master/speakers/jdegoes/intro-purescript/presentation.pdf ...


2

One more thing to note here, besides changing .io to .com is that if you create a short URL for a GitHub URL without providing a custom code argument, you won't be able to use Git.io to shorten the same GitHub URL again with your custom code. For instance I shortened https://1oh1.github.com using the Git.io website without providing a custom code, so now ...


2

The question you linked shows a way to upload text files. Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be a way to upload binary files. Zapier seems to provide ways to upload files (via pull requests) from third party web-apps like Dropbox, Google Drive, … to Github. For Dropbox I found this: Dropbox New File in Directory to Github Create Pull Request GitHub Pull ...


2

Get the RAW link of that README.md file. Then go to web2pdfconvert. Paste link and click Convert to PDF. Download your PDF.


2

Here is the direct link: https://github.com/shantanuo/following In general: github.com/{{username}}/following


2

Currently it's not possible. I have confirmed with GitHub staff by sending email. Currently you can only reply to existing email notification in order to post the comments on the issue. For new issue you have to raise manually on the GitHub site under your repo or use other custom plugins. Though they are considering it as a feature request. Further, if ...


2

Private repositories on your account are locked when you downgrade your paid account to a free one, or if your paid account is seriously past due because of billing problems. When your account is locked, your private repositories cannot be accessed until paid status is resumed. They won't ever be made public, nor will they be automatically deleted. ...


2

They are ordered by due date. Items with no due date are put at the top of the list.


2

Yes, you can. There is two different options: one in the Profile "Public email" and one in Notification center "Primary email address".


2

If the owner of repository B decides to delete that repository, users will not be able to successfully clone/checkout/build my repository anymore. If the dependent code "repo B" vanishes: All users will be able to successfully clone your repo. Existing users will probably have a copy of repo B locally and continue building just fine. Cloned repos do ...


1

The links to Followers / Starred and Following are just below the user pic on homepage! Will not find it in "settings".


1

GitHub flavored markdown supports Using triple back ticks to fence code blocks, which lets you wrap code blocks more easily than indenting every line. Standard Markdown converts text with four spaces at the beginning of each line into a code block; GFM also supports fenced blocks. Just wrap your code in ``` (as shown below) and you won't need to indent ...


1

https://help.github.com/articles/github-flavored-markdown/ Put four spaces before each line.


1

Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be a way to do that. Even when setting the Accept Header to xml, the API returns JSON: $ curl -H "Accept: application/vnd.github.v3+xml" https://api.github.com/repos/github/github-services/issues They parse the xml part of the header correctly, but still return JSON as you can see here: $ curl -I -H "Accept: ...


1

They're useful in allowing you to cross-reference from one repository to another, so that comments or issues raised elsewhere can link back and have a point of context in a way. They're also good for those who want to use GitHub as an issue tracker for the public, who you don't want to see your source code. For example, you have a public repo that only ...


1

Github uses email address to link username to a commit as mentioned here GitHub uses the email address in the commit header to link the commit to a GitHub user. Hence not possible to see values configured via user.name


1

Github's never had openID authentication, so your only option is to create an account.


1

This would be about Git remotes. When you fork in GitHub, the "source" repo will be considered a remote for the new fork. When you clone to your machine, and push back to a new GitHub repo, although the commits (and hashes for them) will be the same, GitHub will not have that "remote" relationship, which means it won’t have the relationship to send a "pull ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible