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15

Yes. See the note on point 4 below. Gmail's filters allow you to manage the flow of incoming messages. Using filters, you can automatically label, archive, delete, star, or forward your mail, even keep it out of Spam. To create a filter Click the down arrow in your search box. A window that allows you to specify your search criteria will ...


12

Sorry, we do not currently have functionality that allows you to use different kinds of stars with filters.


12

Yes In your Gmail settings, under "Accounts and Import", if you have multiple "send mail as" accounts set up you can choose to always default to your Gmail account or to respond with the account to which the message was sent.


12

Go to the list of filters in Settings, edit the filter you want to run, don't change anything, and before you click Update Filter, check the box that says "Also apply filter to [x] matching conversations".


10

Sure. You need to create a filter. Matches: from:(bob@example.com) Do this: Apply label "CLIENT" Matches: to:(my-alternate-email@example.net) Do this: Apply label "non-work related"


10

Gmail shows a preview of the messages that the filter will apply to during the filter setup I'd encourage you to review the results in the future to make sure they are what you expect. Unfortunately at this time it is not possible to revert a filter after creation, but I'm passing along your feedback. If you haven't already, make sure to delete that filter ...


10

Alias = mirror of the original or main email address. Therefore the disk space is shared between the two. Good explanation over here. An alias is essentially just a nickname for a mail account. The alias itself has no mailbox and all mail sent to it will be delivered to the mailbox it is mapped to.


8

Yes, it will display all that apply. For each filter you're able to assign one label. If you happen to have multiple filters catch the same email, they will each label the incoming mail accordingly.


7

Yes. Gmail filters can include multiple components and only flag/forward/tag emails that match the multiple requirements. Some examples from my own filters: from:(removed@gmail.com or removed@removed.com) subject:("Delivery Status Notification") to:(+special) The to:(+special) thing is an interesting filter. Say your user is sender1@gmail.com. You can ...


7

The 'or' function in Gmail is represented by 'OR,' and the 'not' function is represented by a minus (-). You also can use quotes (" ") to specify an exact phrase. From the Gmail help page on Boolean operators.


7

Not directly, no. You need to set up a mailing list, such as on Google Groups. (Really it could be any of a number of services. The key is that there is a single email address to use that will send all messages sent to it on to member email addresses.) However, there's a bit of setup involved and your syndicate members will need to do a little work as ...


7

The workaround I use to do this is to apply labels to filtered messages. From Gmail >> Settings >> Filters you can edit the behavior of existing filters (or new ones) to include "Apply label", once you check that box you can assign an existing label to the filter or create a new one. This way you can see what filters apply to a given email both inline ...


6

It's going to be there for a week, but will only appear at login for a minute or two so you don't get banner blindness. It's a security feature that should help remind you to double-check for any dubious forwarding filters during that time. How long will I see this notice? For about a week, this notice will appear for a few minutes each time you ...


6

Make sure you haven't told Gmail to automatically add a label on POP3 import: To check go to: Settings Accounts and Import Check mail from other accounts (using POP3) Edit Make sure the "Label incoming messages" checkbox is unchecked.


6

From the "About Gmail Search" documentation: Gmail doesn't recognize special search characters like square brackets, parentheses, currency symbols, the ampersand, the pound sign, and asterisks. As you appear to have already discovered, and my quick tests appear to confirm, this seems to include the exclamation mark character. I would assume that the ...


5

I don't think Google supports this feature, but I found a workaround from 2008 that might still work: Create the group in My Contacts Compose an email to said group Copy the "To:" field Paste into the "Convert" textbox here Copy the the "Convert" output into a new filter Try it and let us know if it does what you're looking for.


5

Sorry, we do not currently have operators for lang or charset.


5

Under Settings (click the gear in the top-right corner), Account, look under the section titled Check mail from other accounts (using POP3):. Next to the account, select Edit Info. You should see options to label messages coming into that account with a label. If you check "Archive income messages" the messages will skip the inbox, as the description ...


4

Click on create a filter at the top. Enter the email address you want a label for and click next. There you can say what you want to do with such emails. Click Apply the label: and choose which label you want. Then click the Create Filter button.


4

Instead of "Labeling" the mail, i.e. using the label icon, you can "Move" the mail to a label (using the Folder icon). This will tag the mail with the right label and archive it (no more in the inbox).


4

You can add the NOT (minus) operator in your filter to remove when you are the sender: from:(-iamthesender@gmail.com) subject:[Rhythm Time]


4

A simple filter for to:(@mydomain.com) should do what you need. Simply create a filter on that and apply the label you want. You'll also have the option to "Also apply filter to XXX matching conversations" so you can label any of the messages you've already received.


4

All sent items from within Google Apps are signed like this: example@example.com (Google Drive) If you search for those items in the search field like this: you can either: Select them manually, to do what ever you want; Prior to searching, you can create a filter.


4

It appears that chat/hangout messages are auto-archived in Gmail afterall - providing you don't have any filters set on the user you are chatting with! (This sounds like a bug if you ask me!) I previously had a filter set on this particular user that simply prevented any emails from that user being seen as spam - but this was apparently enough to prevent ...


3

Perhaps you could try creating a separate filter, where you specify that mail with you as the sender skips the inbox.


3

Filters apply to incoming mail, not outgoing. So as of now - you can't do anything to prevent yourself from replying back to these. The closest you can do is create a label titled "do-not-reply-to-these-mails" which is bright red in colour as a reminder


3

This sort of answers my question. You can't stop filters from processing once a condition is met, but you can add a filter to filter messages that have been filtered, which will do in my case.


3

You could export your filters, delete them and then when you are ready to enable them simply import them back in. This is what they suggest you use the Labs: Filter Export/Import function for.


3

Use labels/filters to tag the emails from the ones you want to keep. Use the filter to Archive the emails with those labels. Everything else remaining in the inbox can be assigned to a new label called "deleteme" archive everything with that label At this point there should be nothing in the inbox. Of course all the emails still exist, the archive ...


3

You are correct. The only way to edit Gmail filters all at once is via a XML file.



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