Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Sure! You can use the HTML5 version of YouTube. All you need is a web browser that supports both the video tag in HTML5 and either the h.264 video codec or the WebM format (with VP8 codec). These include: Firefox (WebM enabled version available here) Google Chrome (h.264 supported now, WebM enabled version available via Early Release Channel) Opera (WebM ...


8

Four points that make HTML5 not so hot for YouTube: Cannot point to a particular point in a video with the #t=21m0s portions Cannot watch content protected videos Full Screen Support (currently does full browser screen) Recording directly to YouTube with a webcam On Firefox and Opera, only videos with WebM transcodes will play in HTML5 (found this one on ...


7

Under OS X (and probably on Linux too) the HTML5 video playback uses far less CPU than the Flash video player. This might change when hardware acceleration is released in the OS X Flash Player (currently available as a beta http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/flashplayer10/gala/)


6

Google hasn't made it publicly known what format they store Google Docs in at this time. The closest I can find to anything official is this post: We do not expose our native formats at this time Google Docs supports importing and exporting in a range of formats (including docx, odt, pdf and html), however they convert going each way to their internal ...


5

It could improve existing web office applications that store data by uses the "Web Storage". Coding social networking sites could be easier with SQL Databases and Web Workers to load different parts of the page. Also support for Notifications. Online Photo Editors could use Drag and Drop. These are just some ideas of how to use the new features of HTML 5 ...


4

Vimeo has a Universal Player; http://vimeo.com/blog:334 Instead of being a direct link to a Flash player the new Universal Player can automatically detect what kind of device is viewing the video and choose the optimum player based on the device's capabilities. Hope this helps.


4

Have you looked at Feedly? It is linked to Google Reader feeds and includes your personal twitter feed as well. You can also customize layouts, from lists to galery views, look for suggestions, save articles for later and get recommendations. I don't think it is available for IE but you can find it for Chrome, Firefox, iPhone and now Android.


3

As described here if you use the Chrome browser, install YouTube Options and specify the codec as Flash. By default YouTube options will also change a bunch other aspects of the YouTube interface (e.g., hiding comments, video descriptions, ads, etc.). You may like this, but you may also want to modify some of this plugin behaviour if for example, you like ...


3

Google started phasing out Gears. As of May 2010 Google started phasing out support for offline access in Google Docs through Gears. However, they are still supporting it in order not to break anything. The Google spokesman wrote to clarify in a follow-up e-mail, "We're continuing to support Gears so that nothing breaks for sites that use it. But we ...


3

The issue with the first example is that you are not going straight to the video. Instead of watching as part of a playlist, view the video only: http://youtu.be/KqnB2Ew0SFM This is the full URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqnB2Ew0SFM Now you'll get all the features supported by HTML5.


3

There are probably 5 most talked about features Web workers - allows developers to run scripts in background work so a web application can do more than one thing at a time. Video tag - An easy way to do flash free video online, we just need a standard codec Canvas - Exactly what it sounds like, a way to create an image on the fly within the browser window ...


2

My three favorites are CSS3, Canvas and WebSockets. Combined they can provide really powerful collaboration features to any webapp. WebSockets would replace pseudo-realtime messaging with ajax polling. The few things I see it used so far is web-based chat (lame) and mind mapping webapp (looks really cool when two people are mapping some project).


2

The Canvas and Web Worker Threads are the most exciting aspects of HTML5 to me. I have written some web apps that make use of those features: GioAUTHor [sic] makes extensive use of the canvas to let you plot paths on a map and then find the shortest route from the start to the finish (via Dijkstra's algorithm in JavaScript). JavaScript Thread Demo makes ...


2

YouTube are also supporting the WebM format which will be supported under Firefox version 4. Supported Browsers We support browsers that support both the video tag in HTML5 and either the h.264 video codec or the WebM format (with VP8 codec). These include: Firefox 4 (WebM, Beta available here) Google Chrome (h.264 supported now, WebM enabled ...


2

Still no word regarding offline support for Gmail or Google Calendar. According to the "Update on Google Docs offline and the new Chrome Web Store" on the Google Docs blog, Google Docs will support offline mode in 2011: In addition, at the event today, we were excited to demonstrate a feature that we expect to deliver early in 2011 -- the return of ...


2

you can try JessyInk - which is now part of Inkscape (opensource). There is an comparison or Prezi vs. JessyInk. You can try their showcase presentation - I put a copy of it on my Dropbox here. In discussion they also mentioned Sozi (also opensource) but I did not try it. :-)


1

Google Caja The HTML you're adding is sanitized by the Google Caja Compiler. It will check the embedded code for malicious code, and remove the parts that don't fit. References Google Caja Playground Landing site Google Caja Google Sites HTML box


1

You can use the YouTube Options extension for Chrome: Update (2014-04-12): the YouTube Options extension for Chrome now costs $2: "YouTube Options" cost $2.00 per month, below is a copy of the user agreement one has to confirm prior to using it. This extension is based on a paid subscription model. It costs a flat fee of $1.99 per month, with ...


1

Try deleting your Flash cookies. http://macromedia.com/support/documentation/en/flashplayer/help/settings_manager07.html I had the same issue, in fact I just came here because I was googling for a solution. I noticed that videos that would play in HTML5 on Chrome would play in Flash in Firefox even if I was signed in to Youtube on both browsers so I figured ...


1

You can do this by changing the url with ANY video. Simply take the video id (like the KqnB2Ew0SFM above in the 1st answer and add it after this: http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v= (getting http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=KqnB2Ew0SFM if using that video) This way, the video takes up your whole screen and is forced to play in HTML5 (well, just ...


1

You just need HTML (version usually doesn't matter) Nope. Just use HTML5 as specified. Use those new input types for forms, because they trigger specific keyboard layouts or standard iOS select controls. Use Media Queries: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-mediaqueries/ In addition to favicon you have to specify the icons for iOS devices in the meta tags section: ...


1

If you're willing to switch to Chrome, you can use this extension, which offers the option to force a certain player type. YouTube Options used to be able to do this but it no longer does so.


1

I'm not sure about Flash, but I recognize the problem you're having. Firefox's <video> support hasn't yet been done properly, so it's much slower than any other method. If nobody else suggests something you like better, FlashVideoReplacer would let you swap out the YouTube-provided player for either the Quicktime or VLC plugin and both should run ...


1

I think Glyphboard is a clever example. The app is here: http://mrgan.com/gb/ (iPhone link) and some (technical) background info is here: http://mrgan.tumblr.com/post/98547533/fullscreen-web-apps


1

The best advantage of HTML5 of YouTube player is compatibility with Android devices. When the user click the player to watch a video, no need to skip to YouTube App. Just embed and watch the video within the page, no Flash problems. At PresentationTube, we use HTML5 to allow mobile users watch the video within the page the same as the desktop.


1

Youtube does not offer brightness/speed controls. It might be possible for a website programmer to implement such controls with HTML5, but youtube has not done so. I would recommend adjusting brightness on your monitor, or downloading the video and playing it back with a local media player program with such controls.


1

HTML5's abilities are mainly replacing what Flash does, with the canvas and video tags making videos, games and online image editors much easier to do without Flash. While this may not seem like a big-improvement, Flash is a much bigger problem on non-Windows platforms than Windows.


1

Youtube also has videos available using the HTML5 video tag. This is currently only supported in recent browsers though, and there are some additional pitfalls in the user experience from not using flash which are outlined in this post on the YouTube API Blog.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible