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7

Yes and No, Pretty much every online service has encryption to prevent your documents being compromised if a server or hard drive goes missing (assuming they do all the back ups and fault tolerance their end). However, if you can decrypt / get it using software, it pretty much always means that they would also be able to. Your only real bet is to encrypt ...


7

What about Jungle Disk? It will set up an s3 account as a local drive. I'm not sure what sync capabilities it has natively, but your mac has rsync built-in and you could use that. There's more discussion about other Amazon s3 clients in the question about the best Amazon s3 file manager utility.


5

Backing up someone else's data without consent may violate TOS or laws of state you or they reside in. Visit this information before trying to acquire someone else's data: Ethics of Online Backup Systems Facebook TOS Twitter TOS


4

The gdoc and gsheet files are, as you've discovered, simply pointers to the online version(s) of the file(s). (This only happens if you have the Google Docs app on your PC or Mac, of course.) The only way to make local backups of the files so that they contain your actual data would be to convert them to a different format. Converting a gdoc to a Word file ...


4

The great thing about Dropbox is that anything in the Dropbox folder is always up to date on your computer, even if you have multiple computers, or are working with multiple people. They do require that everything be in one folder (on Windows 7 it's C:\Users\me\Dropbox\, on OSX its /Users/me/Dropbox/, etc.) but one thing you can do is just use softlinks on ...


4

You can always use a TrueCrypt container file within your dropbox folder to accomplish on-the-fly encryption/decryption. see here for more info Under development now is also Boxcryptor that offers similar functionality, but it's still in early testing and not recommended for actual use as of now.


4

Even though there are some workarounds it's strongly not recommended, because either of these services were designed to handle that. Also if it's used to get some extra quota it's against Dropbox's ToS and I'm pretty sure that it is against the Ubuntu One's as well. Here is what a Dropbox dude (N.N.) said on this matter: HELLo! Note that in the ...


3

There are actually many, many options for online backup. I personally love dropbox (get extra 250mb for being referred), but they're not so good for whole disk backup and not cheap too. Still quite good as a "virtual cloud pen drive" with 2 (up to 8gb) for free! For corporate I'd advice either amazon, carbonite or crashplan. Whichever works for you. For ...


3

As a side note: I'd love to mail them a storage device for the first dump And you're also prepared to use such service when you need to restore your whole system? If not, then you may want to consider if an online backup really suits your needs, and see some generic thoughts on some test results at Best choice for a personal “online backup” in ...


2

Jungle Disk (Oh well, I guess I should do some in depth research before asking a question. I have no idea how I missed this one.) Jungle Disk uses AES-256 encryption, which gives you enterprise- level protection for your data. Since you create and control the security key, you truly control the data. Jungle Disk is the only online storage service ...


2

Honestly, any vendor you choose for backup is going to be good if they're worth their beans. And any backup vendor that isn't worth their beans probably doesn't exist anymore. Don't hop on the "startup free backup service" bandwagon, go somewhere that keeps your stuff safe, secure, and most of all, ALWAYS AVAILABLE. A backup vendor with downtime puts you in ...


2

You could encrypt your files (and keep the keys with you of course) like already suggested in most answers here. You could use bcrypt to encrypt a group of files or individual files to avoid download and upload for each edit. But, if the sum of your files is a small number, it would be safer and easier to use a TrueCrypt volume which contains a compressed ...


2

You could use AxCrypt to encrypt individual files transparently (open and edit them after encryption with double-click). This would have the advantage over TrueCrypt that Dropbox would not need to upload the whole container if you changed just one file in it. You would however still loose the benefits of delta syncing.


1

What you want, is a cloned copy of your hard disk, backed up to some Online backup service. Cloning hard disk is not just backing up the contents of the harddisk. It requires creating an exact image of the harddisk, even unused sectors. So that when you restore the image, it it an exact copy of the cloned copy. You can create an image of your harddisk using ...


1

The three security levels currently available in CrashPlan+ (which allows use of CrashPlan Central for online backups) are: Secure key with account password (default) Secure key with private password Use custom data key As for which level(s) to use, it appears that anything but the default meets the goal: Secure key with account password (default) The ...


1

@sam, I'm going to try to answer your specific question about backing up native-Google-format files to your local computer, but I'm not sure how practical or extensible this will if you're trying to back up an entire organization in this manner. As @Al E. pointed out, the Google Drive client does not convert native-format Google Docs/Spreadsheets. Instead, ...


1

I use Dropbox to backup and sync files. It's available cross-platform which is handy as I use it on Windows, Ubuntu, and Mac machines. They give you 2GB free, and charge for anything more than that. Box.net has similar features.


1

Use dropbox. The best syncing tool ever. You just register with them, download and install their application. Authorize your computer. Then you'll see a dropbox folder. Just put in all the files in that folder. That's it. Its will be synced. In free account you get 2GB. Files won't be deleted. It will be there for ever (till dropbox exists & it ain't ...


1

Arq is an online backup tool for Mac, which uses Amazon S3 as backup storage. Arq stores the backup data in your own Amazon S3 account, encrypted with your own password using AES-256. Backups are stored in an open format documented on the website.


1

Further to Wil's answer, Dropbox is one service (and there must be others) which uses rsync to synchronize files - so only changes are uploaded. This should make syncing a truecrypt volume bearable. Reference: https://www.getdropbox.com/help/8. They also have a page on using truecrypt. Shameless whoring time: if you do sign up, you can use this referral ...


1

Yes, if you choose the right online backup provider. If you ensure that they provide an SSL encryption connection to their server and the data is encrypted the other end, it is a good start. One great example of secured online backups is Mozy Online Backup. It uses a secured SSL connection from your computer to the backup server and stores the data ...


1

Cloudberry Backup will do that for you. Encrypts with a unique key before transferring to the cloud. They have versions for S3, Google Drive, Azure, Rackspace. The company has a great Windows freeware client for S3 file transfer, as well.



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