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40

I suggest the use of Keepassx, an cross-platform password manager, and Dropbox. Create your password database with Keepassx and then synchronize it across all of your computers using Dropbox. I've used this approach for about a year and a half with no issues. (I should also mention that Dropbox keeps older revisions of files so even if your database is ...


23

I've never looked into its security, but LastPass (http://lastpass.com/) is designed to do just that


20

Go to aws.amazon.com and click Account > Usage Reports After signing in, select Amazon Simple Storage Service from the Service drop down and then select TimedStorage-ByteHrs from the Usage Types drop down. Select the period of time you want to be reported and use the buttons at the bottom to download the report. The usage report gives a storage total for ...


14

Check out GoogleCL. It lets you interact with google services from the command line like: $ google docs upload the_bobs.csv ~/work/docs_to_share/* The most recent release says it includes uploading directory trees to Docs. A little bit of shell scripting should let you cron job a backup.


13

Archive your messages instead of deleting them/moving them to the trash. Alternatively, you could create a "Trash" or "Deleted" label, then change the label settings to not "show in message list". Move your "deleted" messages to that label/folder and purge every few years!


10

Head over to Accounts/Applications page to check out which apps have what kind of access.


9

Windows Live Skydrive is probably what you're after. 25GB storage with a web-based interface. Slightly more than 50Mb than you want, but free to anybody with a hotmail/msn account.


8

Take a look at lastpass.com - I have no connection to them other than as a satisfied user.


8

If you're going to be doing this on a Linux server you could try GMailFS which uses FUSE to mount your google mail (which should also work with google apps) storage over IMAP as a local file system.


8

A tool called "Google Docs Upload" may do the job: http://code.google.com/p/google-docs-upload/ http://lifehacker.com/5354441/google-docs-batch-upload-eases-online-document-transfers I've had limited success with this tool. Unfortunately, it doesn't support image files yet, although that is now allowed by Google. Ubuntu 10.04 : This works with the ...


7

I don't know if there are any tools for this, but the Google Docs API might allow you to programmatically manipulate uploaded files.


6

Dropbox does exactly what you want.


5

The answer given to this question can help you here. efax.com offers a service to keep your existing number. You have to ring to discuss it. The number I see is a UK one - I'm guessing because the site detects your locale and offers a local service - so I won't post it here as it won't apply to everyone.


5

The Google Apps storage is designed for storing pictures, email attachments and online documents. While there is an API for automating the upload of documents it only accepts specific MIME types unless you are a Google Apps Premier customer. That means you would have to embed your data in a document or spreadsheet file before uploading it. Instead of ...


4

I use http://www.clipperz.com/ it's a great open source webapp that stores passwords and even better if you want to host your own copy on your own server you can. The service includes the ability to download backups in multiple formats, import the data, setup one-time super secure access codes and even an offline copy if you need it.


4

I use KeePass and it has served me well. It's free and has lots of good features. Folders for different groups (Personal, Work, etc), extra fields like URL and Notes.


4

You could also use Dropbox.


3

Windows Live Mesh does this, and it's free. I've used it for sync'ing large projects of source code between my office and home office, and it worked very nicely. It operates via the "cloud" (i.e. it gives you free online storage), and you can specify which devices you want to connect to that cloud repository.


3

New copies are created once the email is sent. The file(s) only exists on the server until the email is actually sent. That's why you can get bounceback messages because an email is too large in size from recipients. The attachments are actually embedded within the email itself when it's sent (and forwarded).


3

Here's my HowTo explaining how to parse S3 Usage Report using bash one liner to get readable results. cat report.csv | awk -F, '{printf "%.2f GB %s %s \n", $7/(1024**3 )/24, $4, $2}' | sort -n


3

Combine the password by usering two passwords. Password 1 might be: jmxkjsjhi Every of your full passwords then begins with jmxkjsjhi . Then add a second password for every website that's different. You can store the seconds passwords in a text file while keeping the first password in your head.


3

Synchronise your browser preferences (including passwords). You can do it with Firefox using Mozilla Weave/Firefox Sync. Or across other browsers using Xmark's password sync


3

I've been using 1Password for a while now, and really like it. It started out as Mac only, but they recently came out with a version for Windows. They also have versions for Android, iOS (iPhone, iPad), and Palm OS. When combined with dropbox, it allows you to keep your passwords synced across systems.


3

You can't do it directly with Google Docs but you can use GMail as an Online Hard Drive with Gmail Drive.


3

You might consider Amazon's SimpleDB service. If your application is small enough in scale, it would probably be free or effectively free (e.g. less than a dollar per month). You certainly can't beat its reliability, although it won't give you the familiarity of something like MySQL: http://aws.amazon.com/simpledb/


2

There's a firefox extension which allows you to use space on Google like a HDD, called GSpace. While this won't solve your batch uploading problem, it might solve your browsing problem. Additionally, you might be able to use the existing code in the plugin and extend it to make it able to batch upload.


2

Much has changed since I posted this question in 2010. Now of course, the proper answer to this question is Google Drive for Windows, Mac, Android, iPhone and ChromeOS devices. However Google Drive doesn't exist for Linux platforms, but there are a few projects attempting to do that. Overview of Google Drive Google Drive lets you store and access ...


2

For those, who afraid of giving their password to a thirdparty: try out KeePass and sync it with the cloud anyhow (like dropbox, google drive, skydrive...). There are some tools to integrate it with your browser.


2

You might want to look at Xmarks as well, manages bookmarks/passwords/tabs across browsers/computers/web



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