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7

GitHub uses a strategy that involves the date-time-offset pattern. When you make a commit, the timestamp includes your offset from UTC. You can see this in the API docs for the Commits. The sample they show there uses a commit timestamp of "2010-04-10T14:10:01-07:00". This is a valid ISO8601 representation of a date-time-offset. For the person ...


5

You can use the compare feature from time.is For example, Comparing New York and GMT at 9:00 gives the following When the time was 09:00 on Tuesday, August 16 in New York, it was 13:00 in GMT. Time since then: 7 hours, 18 minutes and 24 seconds New York is 4 hours behind GMT. New York GMT (+4h) Tue 09:00 Tue 13:00 Tue 10:00 Tue 14:00 Tue ...


5

We have a standing FAQ in our organisation that if you see any sort of timezone-related issues in Gmail your should enable the "Sender Time Zone" lab, reload, then disable the lab again (unless you actually want it). This seems to reset Gmail's timezone handling. We haven't yet got to the root cause yet (despite much back and forth with Google support), but ...


3

Google currently does not do time conversions but you can always ask Google the current time at a location. Just search for "time in <city>" (e.g. time in london). That is the way I use to quickly get the time in a different location. Of course you still have to calculate the difference yourself. EDIT: I just found out that this trick only works if ...


2

Permatime is a nice little site that sets up a URL for your event time and displays it in the viewers local time. e.g. The 2010 World Cup Final in Johannesburg, South Africa.


2

One option is to change your calendar's time zone while you are in the other time zone. I don't really like that option, but I discovered that you can add additional time zones to your calendar's display. Go to the calendar settings, and right below the time zone you can select an additional time zone to display. ...


2

At this time there are only two time zones allowed. The option open to you is to suggest to Google adding more than two displayed time zones. The best place to check first is the official suggested features page for Google Calendar. Seeing as how I could not find this suggestion, it is likely not a high priority for the Google Calendar team at this time. ...


2

If you go to New Page Insights and then click on Likes tab, you'll see a text saying Daily data is recorded in the Pacific time zone, so I believe, that all Facebook Pages ads also starts and ends at midnight PT. However, I have no idea, how to change this and if this is possible at all?


1

This is an interesting question, because Github keeps a history of some activities you do each day, plus it has a "longest streak" record. I narrowed it down. I made a commit at 1am EST, and another at 6am EST. The 1am commit counted against the day before, and the 6am counted as the day of. This corresponds with the comment on this question, that Also, ...


1

Events can only display on your calendar in one time zone at a time. I'm not certain, but it sounds like you created the event for 13:08 in UTC+4, which Google Calendar was (correctly) showing to you as 12:08 in UTC+3 (your main time zone). If you want to see events in another time zone (such as once you arrive in the other country), you would need to go ...


1

There is a suggested fix available that might help but not sure of your exact circumstances. Basically, try resetting your Google Calendar timezone to something else, saving it and then changing it back to your correct timezone.


1

Within TripIt navigate to the Publishing your TripIt Data section in your Settings. In the Calendar Feed section there is a check box Automatically adjust time zones in your calendar feed I have a flight booked from London to San Francisco. It leaves London at 11:30am(BST) and arrives in San Francisco at 2:30pm (PDT) When this check box is checked and I ...



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