Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

GitHub uses a strategy that involves the date-time-offset pattern. When you make a commit, the timestamp includes your offset from UTC. You can see this in the API docs for the Commits. The sample they show there uses a commit timestamp of "2010-04-10T14:10:01-07:00". This is a valid ISO8601 representation of a date-time-offset. For the person ...


7

You can do that with WolframAlpha. 18:30 CEST to GMT+1


5

It's not a bug, it's a feature. http://www.google.com/support/calendar/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=105833


5

You can use the compare feature from time.is For example, Comparing New York and GMT at 9:00 gives the following When the time was 09:00 on Tuesday, August 16 in New York, it was 13:00 in GMT. Time since then: 7 hours, 18 minutes and 24 seconds New York is 4 hours behind GMT. New York GMT (+4h) Tue 09:00 Tue 13:00 Tue 10:00 Tue 14:00 Tue ...


5

We have a standing FAQ in our organisation that if you see any sort of timezone-related issues in Gmail your should enable the "Sender Time Zone" lab, reload, then disable the lab again (unless you actually want it). This seems to reset Gmail's timezone handling. We haven't yet got to the root cause yet (despite much back and forth with Google support), but ...


5

Unfortunately there is no such option. However, Github displays most dates in a relative style anyway - and that's based on your system time so those values are correct.


4

Gmail shows you the time when a message was sent, based on your local time zone. So the time shown is your local time, not the sender's local time when the message was sent


4

Time zones have gone through many changes over the years, and these changes are recorded in the IANA/Olson time zone database. Google uses this data to perform the conversions. When values are being converted from one time zone to another, it is essential to have a date as well as a time. Since the source values you provided are time-only fields, then a ...


4

They will shift to match the time zone when you created the event. For example an event at 15:00 in pacific time will remain at 15:00 in pacific time, but in your new time zone will be shown at 18:00 in eastern time zone.


4

EveryTimeZone is a nice webapp that gives you a really quick simple view of the time (you can drag the 'current time' around) in various common time zones


3

Google currently does not do time conversions but you can always ask Google the current time at a location. Just search for "time in <city>" (e.g. time in london). That is the way I use to quickly get the time in a different location. Of course you still have to calculate the difference yourself. EDIT: I just found out that this trick only works if ...


2

Permatime is a nice little site that sets up a URL for your event time and displays it in the viewers local time. e.g. The 2010 World Cup Final in Johannesburg, South Africa.


2

One option is to change your calendar's time zone while you are in the other time zone. I don't really like that option, but I discovered that you can add additional time zones to your calendar's display. Go to the calendar settings, and right below the time zone you can select an additional time zone to display. ...


2

Try http://time.is/. It's a pretty simple app that shows your local time, based on a world atomic clock, and includes the option for some customization (12/24 hr, calendar, etc).


2

This is an interesting question, because Github keeps a history of some activities you do each day, plus it has a "longest streak" record. I narrowed it down. I made a commit at 1am EST, and another at 6am EST. The 1am commit counted against the day before, and the 6am counted as the day of. This corresponds with the comment on this question, that Also, ...


2

At this time there are only two time zones allowed. The option open to you is to suggest to Google adding more than two displayed time zones. The best place to check first is the official suggested features page for Google Calendar. Seeing as how I could not find this suggestion, it is likely not a high priority for the Google Calendar team at this time. ...


2

If you go to New Page Insights and then click on Likes tab, you'll see a text saying Daily data is recorded in the Pacific time zone, so I believe, that all Facebook Pages ads also starts and ends at midnight PT. However, I have no idea, how to change this and if this is possible at all?


1

Searching from the indian google site does the trick. Searching fifa 2014 gives


1

My workaround is to include the local time in the event's title. At least you can see it when you look at the calendar even though the calendar's scale may be wrong.


1

My system clock was just synced wrong... Move along. Nothing to see here.


1

Events can only display on your calendar in one time zone at a time. I'm not certain, but it sounds like you created the event for 13:08 in UTC+4, which Google Calendar was (correctly) showing to you as 12:08 in UTC+3 (your main time zone). If you want to see events in another time zone (such as once you arrive in the other country), you would need to go ...


1

I find worldtime buddy to be one of the most useful!


1

Within TripIt navigate to the Publishing your TripIt Data section in your Settings. In the Calendar Feed section there is a check box Automatically adjust time zones in your calendar feed I have a flight booked from London to San Francisco. It leaves London at 11:30am(BST) and arrives in San Francisco at 2:30pm (PDT) When this check box is checked and I ...


1

There is a suggested fix available that might help but not sure of your exact circumstances. Basically, try resetting your Google Calendar timezone to something else, saving it and then changing it back to your correct timezone.


1

I still had the problem with an incorrect time stamp in Gmail even after ensuring that the time zone information was set correctly in Windows XP, Gmail, and Google docs. However, after deleting the environment variable TZ, the problem disappeared for me.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible