Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

As mentioned on this thread of the GitHub Google group, repository owners can delete pages from the edit view. The delete button might be easy to miss, since the buttons from the view mode: ...become only slightly different in edit mode: Perhaps GitHub should consider making the interface more obvious (e.g. making the delete button red, or something ...


15

I've found the MediaWiki wiki to be very flexible and useful. As a bonus, it's very familiar to anyone who's used Wikipedia.


15

You really can't beat Confluence, especially for $10 (for 10 or fewer users). We use it at my job and it is really fantastic. The organization takes a little getting used to, though.


14

TiddlyWiki is a single, self-modifying HTML file. It'll run in any modern browser and does not require a server. Put the file in Dropbox and you'll have access to it from any of your machines. Should work fine with a mobile browser. So much the better if there's a mobile Dropbox client to save you from having to mess with syncing files.


13

A TOC in Wikipedia is only generated if the article has more than three sections. The one you linked to only has three, and so it is not generated. If you were to add __TOC__ or __FORCETOC__ to the document a TOC would be generated. __FORCETOC__ causes the TOC to be placed before the first section heading, which would be before "Publications", while __TOC__ ...


9

Disclaimer: I work for Fog Creek The FogBugz wiki is great because it's integrated with the rest of the app, but the editor is buggy. The good news is we're doing a major revamp.


8

I suggest ScrewTurn for wiki. You can also take a look at AxoSoft OnTime which is very good software for bug tracking, scrum/agile project managment, dev wiki, help desk and more.


7

Crowdsourcing Wikipedia has many editors, each editor is usually subscribed to change notifications of the article they created/edited during their Wikipedia activity life span. When you make an edit, one of the editors reviews it and if it's spam he will revert the change to the article previous state. Wikipedia relies on people to filter out the spam, ...


6

I have one non-recommended Wiki : the one available for Sharepoint intranet sites. Utterly a pain to use.


6

yes. but you have to manually keep track of the urls to the documents. and you have to setup manually the edit permissions per document as well. consider using sites.google.com.


6

Google Docs does not make a good wiki. Optimized for printed page, not viewing online (page margins, document margins) Always in edit mode No mechanism to dynamically embed content or especially lists of documents in another document No friendly URLs for documents Does not link documents nearly as easy as in a wiki (requires interaction with menus/mouse ...


5

All you have to do is click the Edit button at the top of an article's page. In the page that you see afterward, you can make your changes and then save them. You won't be able to edit some Wikipedia articles, however - instead of an Edit button, such protected articles will show a View Source button. Also, when editing an article, it is recommended that ...


5

Yes, the Giant Bomb (Whiskey Media) engine does this. Wiki edit task queue (with bounty) http://www.giantbomb.com/wikid/task/queue/ Random user page http://www.giantbomb.com/profile/johnthegamer/ etc, etc. click around to dig deeper. Whiskey Media is the company that created the engine -- it also powers http://animevice.com


5

Here is how you do it : Changing the Title of the Media Wiki Page It looks identical to the wiki you have installed on your website. And it's very simple, Login as Administrator and use the [Move] link on top of the page.


4

Google Sites (http://sites.google.com) lets you set up a free wiki really quickly. It's a really powerful system with lots of cool features. We use it for our companies internal wiki and it works really well. The sites you create can be private or public.


4

DokuWiki is good. By default it uses flat files instead of a database. You can run it on localhost and synchronize with a remote server. There's a great collection of plugins, in fact there's a remote sync plugin, ready to use. The documentation is pretty good as well. Another good solution is Wikidpad. It lives on your desktop, but you can export it as ...


4

I've used PmWiki for my personal wiki purposes. The good thing is that it doesn't use a database; it uses files to store information. So it's very trivial to put in your webserver, and it would just work.


4

We use Redmine (http://www.redmine.org/) which provides a wiki, ticket tracking and (some) subversion integration. It also provides support for forums (which we aren't using at the moment). Might be worth a look.


4

One possible solution is to use a combination of Google Apps. Google Site for the public view and wiki Google Code for code sharing, issue tracking, tasks Google Docs for formal documentation Google Groups You can get very creative with this. Good luck.


4

Wikipedia is currently trying to rename accounts that are currently not "global". As you know, the English Wikipedia is only one of the many wikis available on the network of wikis owned by the Wikimedia Foundation. Many years ago, they decided to implement something called "Single User Login (SUL)" so that users can just log in on one wiki and be logged in ...


4

Possible solution for DokuWiki A post in the DokuWiki User Forum "Relative links in wikipages" mentions this tag. It gives a path to the wiki root, so a link like this one [[this>../../VolD/Projects/]] can link to some page outside the wiki folder without using a full URL. See also the official documentation: https://www.dokuwiki.org/interwiki ...


3

To edit a page in Wikipedia: Visit the page you would like to edit An Edit link appears just above each section; click the Edit link above the text to change Edit the text Click the Save button to record your changes


3

Just go to the relevant article, then click on "Edit" near the top right, make the changes you want, add a summary and click Save Page. The Cheatsheet could well be of use when you're doing this.


3

We use DokuWiki Here is a comparison chart between DokuWiki, MediaWiki, TWiki and TracWiki


3

I setup an intranet site for disseminating research from and to technically savvy, but certainly not technically proficient crowd. I tried several solutions, and PMWiki is the best. Easy to administer, LOTS of "plugins," skins and extensions from the people using it, easy for less-technical folks to use and with a large base, it won't be abandoned anytime ...


3

We're using Assembla in the company I run. They provide unlimited code hosting (Git/SVN), ticketing, wiki, scrum and other useful tools, and doesn't cost much.


3

We tried most wiki packages over the years with little success. It was just tough getting enough traction to get the development and project teams to actually use one. We struck gold after we had converted to Google Apps enterprise for email and calendar as it also comes with "Sites". It turns out Google Sites can work as a very flexible and easy to use ...


3

Wikia is the most common place I've seen to create community wikis on a given topic.


3

This feature has now been released. Only site owners have the ability to enable this feature, which is turned off by default for new and existing sites. To turn on page-level permissions, go to More Actions > Sharing and Permissions. From there, click Enable page-level permissions. Then, in the dialog box, click Turn on page-level ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible