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GOAL

A word, like 'class' can have different meaning \ nuances depending on the context of how it is used.

I would like to understand how to constrain a Google search on a keyword so that it returns results in a constrained context. What I mean by this is that if search on the word classes, I would like to only see the results associated with C programming. I do not want results associated with educational classes or groups of people.

Other examples of constrained contexts could include LINUX, Ubuntu, OSX, Windows 10, Python, etc.

Google enables users to constrain a search within a website using the syntax:

site:fooo.com   classes  -education

In the example of above Google will search the website fooo.com for the word classes and strike results with the term education

QUESTION

What is the syntax to search Google with the constrained context as defined above?

Bonus points if there is a better (standard) term for 'constrained context'

migrated from superuser.com Dec 30 '16 at 20:14

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

  • What's wrong with "C programming classes"? – ale Dec 30 '16 at 20:24
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I am unable to find any indication that Google supports this in a direct fashion; your best bet is to add additional related search terms that will narrow the context - for your example, I might include such additional terms as inheritance, definition, "virtual method" (with the quotes), and so on - you will know best what you are trying to find; choose your search terms accordingly.

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Google Search doesn't include a syntac to constrain result by context, instead it rank the results considering several factors including the user search history.

Considering the above you could start by searching

C programming class

Then add - below the terms that you want o exclude, i.e. course

C programming class -course

And so on

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