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How can I see the number of comments made on a Google Doc? Apart from manually counting them, of course...

2 Answers 2

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  1. Go to your document

  2. In the address/url/search box of your web browser replace the edit from the document URL with mobilebasic

  3. The comments will be numbered with letters.

Let a = 1, b = 2 and so on...

  1. Go to the last comment.

If it has two letters:

Multiply the first number by 26 then add the second number.

Take [ad]:

1 * 26 = 26 + 4 = 30

That is the total comment number.

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  • Thanks a lot. What do you mean by "Replace the edit at the end with mobilebasic" - what edit? End of what? Feb 27, 2019 at 14:25
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    @WilliamHackett-Jones the URL of the document will have a / at the end or edit. Either add mobilebasic to the end or replace edit with mobilebasic
    – user210649
    Feb 27, 2019 at 15:12
  • @WilliamHackett-Jones no problem. If my answer helped please press the tick next to my answer
    – user210649
    Feb 28, 2019 at 7:39
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    Unfortunately, /mobilebasic does not display any of the comments anymore. Mar 29, 2022 at 19:28
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    You sir, just saved me a whole lot of time, thanks! This does work still, you get little blue [xx] notes wherever a comment was attached. If you go to the last comment note and click it, the URL will change to something like /mobilebasic#cmnt176, at least for me that 176 matches up with the [ft] = (26*6)+20
    – Lee
    Oct 13, 2022 at 17:04
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Another way to do this, without the remedial math, is to export them to a spreadsheet, which will also allow filtering. To do this, install the Comments Exporter Add-On, open the document with comments and create an export:

enter image description here

Then open the exported spreadsheet and it will be easier to count all comments (regardless of whether they have been closed or deleted):

enter image description here

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