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tl;dr: Is it possible to filter ("catch") message in Gmail, if the only repeatable pattern (the only common thing) is that such message always comes in three copies (sent to three different email addressed of mine) with exactly the same title and content?


My vendor's database has been stolen and I started to receive spam messages in a huge amount. It is being sent by spambots / spam scripts, so sender and recipient email addresses are always fake. The only common thing is that these messages are:

  • Always delivered in three copies (to all three addresses of mine)
  • Always with exactly the same title and content

Since there is a very little chance that any legitimate sender will send three exactly the same copies of the same message, I was wondering, if there is any way filter out all messages that appears in Spam box (in case of Gmail) that exists there in exactly three copies?

EDIT: I have found and read this answer (and a couple of other similar here) and find it not resolving my question. Main reasons are:

  1. Both question and all answers are 10-11 years old. A decade is an era in IT. A number of things that has changes in both Gmail in general and in its SPAM prevention filters through these ten years is vast.

  2. Top voted answer doesn't bring any help to me because it says about SPAM prevention filters in Gmail, while my SPAM is already correctly detected as a SPAM (and I want it to be deleted automatically instead).

  3. Top voted answer isn't helpful because it says about filtering labels which are in case of my SPAM (and many, many other examples) auto-generated by spam-scripts and is different each time I receive new matching message.

  4. Second top-voted answer cannot be implemented in my case, because it says about changing from main email address to some alias. I cannot stop using my main email address and replace it (even virtually) with an alias because this is a company address used for 12+ years so far.

  5. Second top-voted answer is talking about using "plus sign" solution. This solution is solely Gmail's invention and is being rejected by most old email servers (messages with a plus sign in email address are not being delivered actually). I did a way to much experiments with "plus sign" feature on my mail servers to no avail.

Again, to clarify: My question is not about how to handle SPAM in my Gmail, but if there is any way to filter it out (and send it directly to Deleted folder, skipping Spam folder, if:

  1. I don't know the sender (because sender is auto-generated and different each time).
  2. May other elements of the message itself are auto-generated and therefore cannot be used as a base for Gmail's filters.
  3. The only thing that is common is that messages always comes in three copies with exactly the same title and content.

I assume that the answer to my question is probably something like: "No, Gmail's filter doesn't allow to perform such matching". And the reason I am asking is to get confirmation of this assumption.

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I assume that the answer to my question is probably something like: "No, Gmail's filter doesn't allow to perform such matching". And the reason I am asking is to get confirmation of this assumption.

That's right, it's not possible to filter message in Gmail based on its number of duplicates.

One could however theoretically use a POP/IMAP client to detect such a pattern and archive these emails. (with Gmail, IMAP can only archive, not delete). I don't know any POP/IMAP client supporting that natively.

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    The POP/IMAP client probably not. But a SpamAssassin installed and correctly configured behind the working mail server should be able to do, what you are proposing.
    – trejder
    Commented Apr 14, 2023 at 17:56
  • This is another use case for Google Apps Script which can delete
    – Blindspots
    Commented Jun 16, 2023 at 23:23

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