4

I want to accomplish the following:

string = TEST; cell reference = B2, value = ING; RESULT = TESTING

Which of the following options are the best to use?:

  1. CONCAT: =CONCAT("TEST",B2)
  2. & operator: ="TEST" & B2
  3. CONCATENATE: =CONCATENATE("TEST", B2)
  • 1
    "Best" in what way? – ale Sep 28 '17 at 0:20
6

CONCAT() and & do the same thing, so in that case there isn't a difference between them (just personal preference I suppose)

CONCATENATE() can also be used to join 2 items, however it's typically used to join greater than 2 terms.

Which one is best? I'd say whichever option makes the formula the most readable, in this case I would say CONCAT() only because you can easily identify which function you're running, and the terms "TEST" and B2 are clearly defined as the arguments.

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  • A clear and concise answer. That's exactly the answer I wanted Web Applications to have !! – Jacob Jan Tuinstra Jan 10 '13 at 20:26
1

I'd choose:

="TEST"&B2

because I don't generally like typing any more than necessary.

And for sites like SO, SU and WA it can be one less language issue.

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