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When inserting an image into a Google Document, text can be made to wrap around the image by clicking on it and choosing the "Wrap Text" option. How can I also add a caption to the image, with text still wrapped around the image and caption?

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    Since all the answers suggest using Drawings, note that they are not included when you download the file as .docx :( – Gerhard Burger May 8 '17 at 20:38
  • Try captionizer add-on. To use it select image and go to Add-ons > Captionizer > Images > Number selected image. – Jacka Nov 18 '18 at 20:13
  • The Caption Maker plugin can create captions for figures and tables including numbering and listing them. – Falko Menge Jun 24 '19 at 14:07
  • Don't have the rep to answer this but I've found a workable solution in format > columns .. can be a bit fiddly with edits, etc. but lets you retain full quality images (and editable captions) separated from the flow of the doc (without breaking the flow). Add your text content followed by your inline images, split into two columns, add as many newlines as you need (shared between / after your text content & last caption) so your images appear in a single column. – som Apr 15 at 1:53
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As of October 25, 2013, Google Documents does not support text wrapping around tables, so inserting a table and putting an image and a caption in it will work but cannot be made to have text wrapped around it.

One workaround is that since text can wrap around images, we can choose Insert > Drawing... and create a drawing with the text we want to caption the image with. The resulting drawing can be changed to have text wrapped around it, and can then be placed beneath the image we inserted.

Here is a short gif showing the process:

enter image description here

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    He is the OP, and tables are a suggested work around. – Catskul Jan 20 '14 at 18:58
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    This appears to sadly be still true as of Nov 2016. Come on, Google! – Oskar Austegard Nov 23 '16 at 16:11
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    2018 - still true – Ronen Teva Jul 13 '18 at 8:13
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    2019 - still true – Shivam Gaur Jan 21 '19 at 5:29
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    2020 - still true – Sander Koldenhof Jan 2 at 14:42
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  1. Choose Menu -> Insert -> Drawing.

  2. Drag/Drop, Ctrl-V or right-click and paste in your image.

  3. Click the "Textbox" button near the top.

  4. Draw the textbox underneath your image, add some text.

  5. Set the lettering font/format with the "more" button upper left.

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    Which one is the "Textbox" button? Does this still exist? – bers Aug 30 '17 at 12:46
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    That blurs the images too much. You can add the image to the document and then put the caption in as a drawing. – user73457 Jul 26 '18 at 7:52
  • @user73457 Yeah. Google Docs is still super limited. If you download as docx, for example, you get the caption as textbox, unformated. So some editing will still be needed. But if you download as pdf, then it is blurred as hell. – A. Vieira Mar 26 '19 at 9:05
  • There is no textbox button. You can't float images, you can't caption images. It gives you an inline or wrap option (as if anything other than inline is available anyway), but no free placement option. "Super limited" is putting it lightly. – Triynko Jun 17 '19 at 23:50
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You can paste the image into Insert>Drawing, and then add a textbox underneath it and save that. However, there is no way of automatically captioning an image, which I think is a problem that needs to be solved.

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This can be done by using the Insert -> Drawing option. Here is a guide on how to do add a caption and wrap text around an image or a table: https://web.archive.org/web/20141013025810/http://chromebookandroidnews.wordpress.com:80/2014/09/08/how-to-caption-and-wrap-text-around-images-or-tables-in-google-docs/

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  • The site no longer exists. Do you remember the instructions? – The Unknown Dev Apr 17 '16 at 15:24
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You can put in a text box in if you insert the image as a drawing.

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