4

An unknown person, who seems (!) to be trustworthy, wrote me an e-mail with a link to a document on Google Drive. I'm not sure if it's malicious or not.

Is there a safe and simple way (maybe a website) to test a public Google Drive link for malicious code without downloading it to my machine?

  • 1
    Google runs virus scans and scans for executables and vbs files on uploads to Google docs. support.google.com/a/answer/172541?hl=en – Piers Karsenbarg Feb 28 '14 at 19:20
  • Thanks, Piers, for adding that. Could you transform your comment into an answer, so I can accept it? – twigmac Mar 3 '14 at 14:01
  • It was an answer but it appears it's been converted to a comment. I'll re-add it – Piers Karsenbarg Mar 3 '14 at 15:04
2

Is there a safe and simple way (maybe a website) to test a public Google Drive link for malicious code without downloading it to my machine?

Google runs virus scans and scans for executables and vbs files on uploads to Google docs.
See following reference: support.google.com/a/answer/172541?hl=en

3

You could use a Sandbox software, like Sandboxie. A sandbox software runs a program (or more) in a protected environment. Programs and files in a sandbox cannot access the rest of your system.

Here are some other examples.

  • Thank you for your answer, @Punchlinern, which was helpful because it gave me a new direction to investigate. Unfortunately, there aren't many simple sandbox tools for my operating system, Ubuntu. I will edit my question to stress more the "without downloading" aspect. – twigmac Feb 26 '14 at 16:43
1

Install Ubuntu, Windows, etc. in VirtualBox etc. Use virtual OS as your sandbox. Make a copy of the virtual OS or a snapshot before testing such things.

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