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I want to find out what the average screen resolution is for visitors to my website – or rather, what is the average width and the average height in pixels.

To qualify what I mean by "average" – and maybe "average" isn't the right word (though I think most of the respondents understood my meaning) – I would like to know when a hypothetical "average" visitor comes to my website, what would their screen height and width be?

I realize it's by no means the end of a comprehensive analysis of screen resolutions, and I recognize the saying that "analyzing averages tends to produce average results"...

My data looks like this:

+-------+--------+----------+
| Width | Height | Sessions |
+-------+--------+----------+
|  1366 |    768 |    72212 |
|   768 |   1024 |    71440 |
|  1920 |   1080 |    41332 |
|  1280 |    800 |    37427 |
|  1600 |    900 |    34688 |
|  1280 |   1024 |    27461 |
|  1440 |    900 |    27008 |
|  1024 |    768 |    26432 |
|   320 |    568 |    22239 |
|  1680 |   1050 |    16980 |
|  1280 |    720 |    16543 |
|   320 |    480 |    16400 |
|   360 |    640 |    13889 |
|   720 |   1280 |     9777 |
|  1093 |    614 |     9283 |
|  1536 |    864 |     8523 |
|  1920 |   1200 |     7110 |
|  2560 |   1440 |     4032 |
+-------+--------+----------+

I tried making a pivot table but that didn't work

My issue is that Sessions column, which obviously complicates things

Another question that comes to mind, and may also be answered through this analysis includes (though not officially a part of this question):

What % of sessions had a screen height/width of over/under X pixels?

As well as segmenting by desktop and tablet users

  • 1
    Avg res = 1207 * 878 – Jacob Jan Tuinstra May 23 '14 at 6:25
  • 1
    @pnuts that's clearly a typo. – Jacob Jan Tuinstra May 23 '14 at 11:31
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    Hi, since I wanted to do it in a spreadsheet (and I use Google Docs) I thought this the best place to ask among people who would be likely to regularly use web based spreadsheet applications – Drewdavid May 23 '14 at 16:44
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This is what I came up with.

Screenshot

enter image description here

Explained

Column F expresses the weight of the measurement in the series. Multiplying the height and the width by the fraction, will yield the corresponding fraction. A summation will yield a weighed height and width.

Example

I've created an example file for you: Average Resolution

  • Hi thanks for this – that average height looks too big though don't you think? There are only three values that exceed your average of 1207, and they are all well into the lower 'Sessions' rows, combined only making up about 20,000 sessions – Drewdavid May 23 '14 at 16:43
  • Look at the formula please @drewdavid. Height is width and visa versa. It's a typo.... – Jacob Jan Tuinstra May 23 '14 at 16:47
  • Thanks ok; I'll review the attached example and then come back to the question :) – Drewdavid May 23 '14 at 16:52
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In this case, you need to think about the nature of the underlying data, as well as the calculations.

"Average" is a loaded word: it can mean arithmetic mean, median, mode etc.

I would say that the most sensible overall measure of average screen resolution is the one that occurs most-frequently in your data - and that is the Width:1366 / Height:768 combination. (Which you've already used the sort feature to find.)

As shown in the other answer here, it is possible to calculate the weighted arithmetic mean of width and height separately. And there may be some uses for these values. But you can pretty much guarantee that none of your visitors will have exactly that screen resolution. So I'm not sure those uses will be.

If you really want to do some calculations, then some estimates of the number of sessions that have smaller resolution (on either dimension) than the most commonly occurring one could be meaningful. For these, you will just need to sum the count-of-sessions column - possibly using the SUMIF() function.

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Just for fun. The essence of the question as it stands might be simplified along the lines of “what is the average velocity over an hour of 500 cars travelling 2 km N & 50 km E and 40 cars 5 km N & 10 km E”. Applying @Jacob’s approach I think the answer would be 2.2 km to the North and 47 km to the East per hour – though that is not where any one of the cars would be after one hour so, as mentioned by @MaryC, a calculation that does not to me seem of any practical use:

WA60954 first example

The data provided may be visualised as below, where the red dot represents 878x1207:

WA60954 second example

and another dot at 1440x900 seems more ‘representative’ than the red dot of a resolution that is close to that for a large number of sessions – and has been chosen to be a combination of width and height that exists in the dataset.

If my calculations are correct, 1440x900 for width and height is within 20% for each dimension for more than half of all sessions. It is also much closer to the 1366x768 for sessions maximum than 878x1207.

  • The first big bulb is 18 mm on my screen (1366 * 768). The far right (2560 * 1440) should be 17 times smaller (to take in account the frequency), thus 1 mm. It is however 4 mm. Can you explain that? – Jacob Jan Tuinstra May 23 '14 at 11:31
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    Wow, I just had a huge leap to the past. Thanks for that !! – Jacob Jan Tuinstra May 23 '14 at 12:04

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