2

I see that you can insert equations, but I would love to have the freedom of TeX, all mathematics symbols.

Is there any way to insert e.g. $$ \int_{0}^{\infty} $$ and it parses it?

4

No, Google Documents do not contain a LaTeX parser. There is a limited support for TeX macros, mostly for characters: you can type \int followed by a space and get the integral sign; then type ^ and get superscript, etc. To use the full power of LaTeX, you need a LaTeX processor, which Google Docs is not.

By the way, the documentation to which I linked appears to be outdated: Docs support more than is listed there (examples). The only way to know for sure what's there is to try a command. Just remember that Docs requires space after command, and does not use {} grouping, relying instead on Word-type maneuvers like "Tab to go from numerator to denominator".

  • I needed especially \frac, \vec, \sqrt and some more would be tex-awesome. Thanks for your information. – Kai Noack Jul 17 '15 at 5:01
  • Those three are supported, even though I don't see \vec listed in the documentation. It seems that documentation is outdated, and Docs support more than is listed there (examples). The only way to know is to try a command, remembering that Docs requires space after command, and does not use {} grouping. – user79865 Jul 17 '15 at 5:07
  • Okay, just now I see that you have to do >Insert >Equation and then the commands above work. I tried it directly in the document at first. Thanks for the infos. Now it would be great to know a shortcut to bring up the equation. – Kai Noack Jul 17 '15 at 8:57
  • LaTeX is a macro package that is an add-on for raw TeX. The above answer does not make that distinction and thus does not really answer the question. – August Mohr Aug 19 '15 at 1:14

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