1

Amazon Music provides the user with a column showing grey bars in the song list table. Some of these bars are orange. So the UI element kind of gets "filled up" from the left. It feels like they are more filled (orange) on popular songs.

For example the less popular "Prison Song":

"Prison Song" entry at Amazon Music

And in comparison "Chop Suey!":

"Chop Suey!" at Amazon Music

Also, it's not the user-rating of the songs since for example the Prison Song doesn't have any (at the time this question is written)!

Hovering with the mouse over the element doesn't provide you with a tool-tip. Here's a link to an album which illustrates the behavior pretty well. Be aware that you will have to log in to gain access!

The source of the element looks like this:

Source html

What does this UI element represent? What does it (so, "popularity") exactly mean? Is it for example the download-count, the "views", the ratings or a combination of them etc.?

2

If you inspect the source code of the page you will see:

<td class="popularity">
   <div class="trackPopularityContainer">
   </div>
</td>

It's the popularity of the songs. iTunes has a similar thing.

The yellow bars you're seeing indicate the popularity of the track. The more yellow bars that are displayed, the more popular the song.

cit. Amazon Forum

  • I've already stated that it's the popularity. However, what does "popularity" mean? Is it how often it has been downloaded, the user-rating, the "views" (so, "listens"^^) etc. Thanks for your answer however! – OddDev Sep 9 '16 at 9:50
  • I edited my answer. – 1415 Sep 9 '16 at 9:57
  • I'll wager that "popularity" probably doesn't have a hard definition. It's probably just a combination of number of downloads, clickthroughs, sales, etc., and is just a way to make a comparison between tracks. – ale Sep 9 '16 at 12:42
  • For instance, in this thread on Amazon's forums, the only official response is "...the yellow bars you're seeing indicate the popularity of the track. The more yellow bars that are displayed, the more popular the song." So, that's using a word to define it. – ale Sep 9 '16 at 12:44
  • I always got wrong – 1415 Sep 9 '16 at 17:30

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