8

Short version Replace the pound signs in the following URL with the cluster number of the article of interest https://scholar.google.com/scholar_alerts?view_op=create_alert_options&hl=en&alert_params=hl%3Den%26as_sdt%3D2005%26cites%3D####################%26scipsc%3D. Long version None of the other couple of answers worked for me, so I found a new ...


6

Short answer: Get the cluster ID (20 digits) of your article Plug it in the end of the following URL: https://scholar.google.ch/scholar?oi=bibs&hl=en&as_sdt=5&cites= Click on the "Create alert" button in the left pane of the page. Long answer Prerequisites: you need a Google Scholar profile for this. 1. Find the cluster ID of your article (...


5

I've already had the same problem. Here's a python code for dealing with that: https://github.com/WittmannF/sort-google-scholar My suggestion is that you rank by citations/year rather than the absolute number of citations (usually older articles are more cited).


5

Looks like that's not possible. There is a setting at http://scholar.google.com/scholar_settings called Results per page, but it only offers 10 and 20. If you chose 20, it will add &num=20 to your query string. You can reduce that value (e.g to 5) to get less results, but scholar does not seem to honour values lager than 20.


4

Google Scholar does not share DOI information anywhere, if they use it at all. There is currently no extension that does what you request. However, we can consider what it would take to make one. We have three ways we might find the DOI from the information Google Scholar does provide: We can start with the article title and search for the DOI using https:/...


3

Google Scholar provides no option to get the DOI of the results. In the hope that there might be some browser extension doing the job, I asked Adding DOIs in Google Scholar results in the software recommendation Stack Exchange website.


3

Click the "Edit" link next to "My profile is public". Select the "My profile is private" option.


2

Well, There is another solution which I have been using for a while. If you are using Zotero for your reference management (if you don't I strongly recommend to do so), there is a plugin which downloads the number of citation from google scholar: install Zotero go to this GitHub Repo and download the plugin and install it as instructed on you Zotero app add ...


2

Try SymbolHound. Compare http://www.symbolhound.com/?q=in-memory+databases with http://www.symbolhound.com/?q=in-memory-databases


2

You can submit a website with academic articles to Google Scholar (see Inclusion - Scholar Help). They specify: We accept journal papers, conference papers, technical reports, dissertations, pre-prints, post-prints, and abstracts. If your new institution hosts your papers as part of your CV or something to that effect, however, you might have an ...


2

Steps necessary: Create a throwaway special purpose e-mail account on the Web, with a username/password pair different from whatever you use elsewhere. (THIS IS IMPORTANT to minimize damage in case of security breach). Register at Emails2RSS. Step 2 gives you another e-mail address @emails2rss.appspot.com. In your special purpose account, set up forwarding ...


2

You cannot in Google Scholar. I personally use CiteSeerX to browse easily the references without having to search them one by one, e.g. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.110.7684


2

Try the advanced search or write in the search box "class size" ("The Journal of Political Economy" OR "The American Economic Review")


1

A kind librarian at the Boston Library Consortium answered this for me, If you go to Google Scholar's page, it will have an "Alerts" icon at the top and after you click on that, it will have a red button for creating an alert then you put in a query and save it. So in the example, the query would be allintitle: hamster Publication: "journal of ...


1

You can't do that within Google Scholars. You need an external software to do this. Internet Download Manager has a grabber that can grab specific file formats from a webpage. Download and install, IDM, click grabber and set it up to download all the pdf files of that page.


1

Some tips from this link and listed below: The best was to use the Publish or Perish software (http://www.harzing.com/pop.htm). It cycles through the pages of a Google Scholar search results list and copies the basic information for each result to a results list that can be copied in CSV or Excel format. The other method was to use Zotero (www.zotero.org) ...


1

You cannot see your search history in Google Scholar.


1

Google Scholar allows you to create search alerts, which don't depend on your article having already been cited. You could create search parameters for your paper and create an alert: Do a search Click on the Alerts icon at the top (the envelope) Sign in Create and name the alert As I mentioned in my comment, Indiana University's Journal and Search ...


1

select the option "Sort by date" in google scholar. then select the Search: "abstracts" button. only searches Articles added in the last year, sorted by date.


1

It had been gone in redesign few months before you asked this question and most probably you had enough time to assure yourself it won't return ever. One mitigation would be adding those keywords from topic to search query text. The other could be limiting search down to particular publishing site with site:example.com/path stem, if you know that info in ...


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