23

Please try with layout as shown. Select A1:C11 (or to suit), insert Line chart with Use row 1 as headers and Use column A as labels:


21

What you need to do is a few steps: Insert to Chart then add your Data Series, as you normally would with a Single Axis chart. (Optional) Change chart type to Line. You can change it to anything else later. Line seems to be a safe bet for the later options to appear. Not sure if this step is by Google design... Right-click on the chart and select Series. ...


15

Today's Google announced that now it's possible to add data labels. For the data included in the question, Move the first column to the rightmost position. | A | B | C | -+---+---+------+ 1| 36| 1|Name1 | 2| 22| 3|Name2 | 3| 21| 6|Name3 | 4| 4| 2|Name4 | 5| 8| 2|Name5 | Note: Labels should be text. If the labels are numbers, dates, times, ...


14

This is an excellent time to use a pivot table. Select columns B and C, then click on Data → Pivot table... In the Pivot table editor sidebar on the right side: In the Columns section, add the Category field. Uncheck Show totals if you do not want the Grand Total column. In the Values section, add the Category field and summarize by COUNTA. Now ...


13

Google should now respect X-axis date values for Line, Area, Scatter, and Time Line charts. For example, if you have the following data*: | Date | Value | |------------|-------| | 01/01/2016 | 3 | | 02/01/2016 | 4 | | 03/01/2016 | 5 | | 03/15/2016 | 6 | | 09/01/2016 | 3 | | 12/01/2016 | 3 | *where the date values are stored ...


11

The closest thing to a Boxplot Chart is a Candlestick Chart. You could calculate all the data needed to plot a box chart: The Five Number Summary and plot each serie individually. Apparently, the width of the box isn't important. I've prepared an example file: Box Plot example (sample data). Screenshots In Google Apps Script, the box charts are un-...


7

You can use the addon g(Math) it is under statistical display and will create a box and whisker chart as below.


6

First, calculate the linear regression factors: y=ax+b with the following formula: =LINEST(B2:B21;A2:A21) Then add another column next to the y-axis and name it calculated y-axis. Build the following formula to calc. the y-axis and copy that for all x-values.: =$D$3*A2+$E$3 Next is a piece of cake. Add the calculated y-axis to the existing data range or ...


6

Yes. On that same tab there is a selection for Data Select Ranges On the popup, choose your HEADER row first. This is important. Then click on add another range. Now choose your data. Click Ok Under "combine ranges" choose vertically. Make sure the box is checked that says "use row XX as a header". (this would be the first range you chose). I think that ...


6

Not really a better answer but more expressing your idea in a different way. Plot Average-variance under, variance under, variance over: The above is a stacked area chart with the first series transparent.


6

In the chart's menu, go to Advanced Edit..., then in the Chart types tab you can enter the range. If you need to skip some columns, enter 2 ranges separated by a comma, one to left of the column you need to skip, and one to the right. This is how it looks like in a chart I maintain - skipping columns E to G and M to O: C15:D948, H15:L948, N15:P948


5

Just use the standard print dialog in Chrome (File -> Print / do not use the shortcut cmd+p, as this opens up a Google sheet specific print pop-up) and chose "save as PDF" (tried on a Mac/OSX). This exports the charts in a vector format. There is no need for a Chromium add-on.


5

The new behavior is likely due to an internal change since the last update introducing the new Google Sheets. My suggestion would be to add an intermediary sheet to connect to the commute chart. The new sheet would contain linked values from the Times sheet. You could then perform arithmetic and formatting operations on it while keeping the Times sheet ...


4

Google Charts are HTML5 SVG objects. Means vectors. Means highest possible quality. I still do not get it why Google doesn't provide native solution to export in SVG. Google Chart to SVG vector file Follow these steps: Create chart in Spreadsheet From the chart menu choose Publish to the web Select your chart from the list and choose Interactive Copy URL ...


4

In lieu of a standard solution, I created a crude Google Apps Script to reload my embedded image upon opening the document. Open the Script Editor, and enter the following code, substituting the URL with your own published chart URL: function open() { // replace this URL with your published chart URL var url = "https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/[...


4

Is this roughly what you want?:


3

Not natively, however here is a workaround: You can create a chart with the custom colors using Microsoft Excel, and then save this document and import it into Google Drive. If you then open the xlsx file with Google Sheets it will automatically convert the formats, and keep the custom colors you added. This obviously limits the complexity of the charts ...


3

You can reproduce the required table using a formula (this will only work on the newest version of Sheets): =QUERY({A:A,A:A},"select Col1, count(Col2) where Col1 is not null group by Col1 label Col1 'Date', count(Col2) 'Number'",0) And then reference that output for your graph. If you are on the old version: =ArrayFormula(QUERY(IF({1,1},A:A),"select Col1,...


3

If you right-click on the chart itself (i.e. the central area) and select the 'Edit: > Axis > Axis area' menu item, it allows you to edit the area the chart occupies. You can drag it up from the bottom to allow more room for the labels on the horizontal axis. This isn't exactly the most intuitive, and doesn't give as much control as you'd probably like, but ...


3

I assume you know how to make a chart where the X is date, Y is your moving average (if you have the value). Moving Average Google Sheets Used Google searches to find: How to sum up rows above - modified to select previous column and to include current row =SUM(INDIRECT(ADDRESS(1,COLUMN()-1)&":"&ADDRESS(ROW(),COLUMN()-1))) Row function - Row ...


3

Use the SMA (Simple moving average). It works as follow Take W points back (e.g. 3, 5 or 10, that's your window size) and do an average for them. This will create a new point Use those newly created points to plot your line. NOTE: at the end you'll have N-W+1 points where N is original number of points and W is your window size Here is an example google ...


3

select the chart click on three dots select either Copy chart or Move to own sheet


3

As of today's version of Google Sheets (on Dec 6, 2019), we can do this to make the values appear: Create your pie chart (assuming you know how) Click in the upper right of the chart, on the 3 dots. "Chart editor" will appear on the right. Under "Chart editor", there will be "Setup" and "Customize". Click on "Customize" There should be a selection for "...


3

Yes, it is parameter linewidth. Example : =SPARKLINE(L4:L;{"linewidth"\3}) Reminder on how to construct a =sparkline : =SPARKLINE("range",{"charttype"\"line","xmin"\0,"ymin"\0,"color"\"orange","empty"\"ignore","linewidth"\6}) More on sparkline here.


2

In new Google Sheets a chart can be drawn from a pivot table, no gadget necessary: Alternatively, check Aggregate column A:


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