41

It looks like this is a known issue, and Google is on top of it. From the product forums: We've gotten reports about some users being signed out of their accounts unexpectedly. We're investigating, but not to worry: there is no indication that this is connected to any phishing or account security threats. Please try to sign-in again at accounts.google.com ...


22

Google found that security questions were not really secure at all as most of the answers can be found with a simple Google search. For example Sarah Palin had her Yahoo! account hacked because someone simply Googled her birthday, ZIP code and where she met her spouse. Google has completely removed support for security questions and one only had the ...


18

Google offers quite a few tools to help you keep unwanted persons out of your account, but some of them only work if you activate and use them. Keep your Account Recovery Options up to date Mobile telephone number: If you forget your password, or if there is unusual activity on your account, Google can send you a security code via SMS for you to prove you ...


18

You can create redundant code before your device is lost or a reason. Deactivate MFA, then configure and enable a virtual MFA device for use. Make a secure backup of the secret configuration key or QR code. For example, if you lose the smartphone where the virtual MFA app is configured. Google Authenticator → Set up account → Enter provided key Account ...


11

From the G Suite Administrator Help: Sign in to your Google Admin console. Sign in using an administrator account. From the Admin console dashboard, go to Security and then Basic settings. To see Security on the dashboard, you might have to click More controls at the bottom. Under Less secure apps, select Go to settings for less secure apps. In the ...


10

Authenticator works even when you don't have any sort of network available for your smartphone. I don't know about your mobile provider, but I don't trust mine to deliver SMS messages in anything that resembles a timely manner. Beyond that, it is more secure, as you've noted.


10

As far as I can tell, you can't directly change your password the web site or the Android app (I don't know about iOS). You can, however, request that they reset your password. Log out of the web site (if you're currently logged in) Instead of logging back in, click "Forgot password" Follow the instructions


9

You really can't stop them from trying but you can make your account more secure. For GMail / Google account I would setup the 2 step authentication. The 2 step process links your smartphone to your account so when you log in and get through, google will also send you a pin to your smartphone from which you will then verify. Much more secure.


9

It's because you might have some other security alerts into your account that you haven't reviewed yet. Here's a simple way to do that: Go to https://myaccount.google.com/security-checkup You will see this security checkup box: Click on the unresolved issues. Click on the 3 dots menu on top right of the specific issue and choose ...


8

No, not everything with everyone. That would be wrong and insane Here's from official documentation: (click on link to see everything, I'll just quote up a few paragraphs) WITH OTHER PAYPAL USERS When transacting with others, we may provide those parties with information about you necessary to complete the transaction, such as your name, account ID, ...


7

As far as I can tell, there's no backup codes option, though I too would like to see one. This article describes your next best option: All I had to do was go to the Unusable Authentication Device page and fill out just two fields of a simple form providing my Primary phone number I used to register my AWS account and then select the problem I encountered ...


7

That you aren't seeing the option to enable the 2-factor authentication in your settings page may indicate that the Administrator for your Google Apps for your domain hasn't enabled the feature to be used by people in your Google for Business instance. If that is the case, the answer to your question would be: The administrator for your Google Apps ...


6

Google is probably using information that it has not specifically requested of you during the password reset process in order to verify your ownership of the account. Specifically, tokens stored on your computer, and your IP address. I had a similar experience to yours, which initially alarmed me, and tested the above theory by using the Tor browser to ...


6

I would configure the account to enable IMAP so that you can download messages (with their attachments) from Gmail using an email program such as Thunderbird, Apple Mail or Microsoft Outlook. Using a mail client with IMAP gives you an alternate method to access mail messages; GMail labels, Drafts and Sent Messages will appear as folders in the email program....


5

you have three options: 1. browser auto logoff on exit By removing your browsing history as soon as you close the browser, this makes sure that no one sees or uses your history if you are sharing the same computer, you have to search inetcpl.cpl in run menu - WINKEY + R - there you will get Internet properties menu there you have to select Delete browsing ...


5

Follow these steps: Account > Security > 2-step Verification Setting > Registered Computers > Require Codes


5

The best way to solve this problem is to set up a second account for your work. That's the most secure way. It's better if everything is strictly seperated.


4

As I know, logging into Google does not give sync permission to the browser unless you sign in to "Google Chrome" which you may be prompted for, when opening Google Chrome browser. So pay attention if you are prompted for such a thing. Also on a public machine, I recommend using Incognito mode for Chrome (by pressing CTRL+Shift+n) and Private Browsing mode ...


4

No, you can't do that. There is nothing in Gmail's settings to restrict from where your account can be accessed. Really, you shouldn't have to. Google already does some checking to see if your account is being accessed from wildly divergent locations. According to the Google Online Security Blog: You may remember that a while back we launched remote sign ...


4

EDIT: Cognito Forms now supports full encryption of all entry data and uploaded files at rest. Furthermore, you can mark sensitive fields as protected to ensure they are not inadvertently transmitted insecurely, such as through email notifications or insecure redirects/webhooks. Learn more about Cognito Forms security at: https://www.cognitoforms.com/...


4

I recently got a similar message, "Your Google verification code is" and then an unusually long verification code (much more than the normal six characters you get through 2 factor authentication). An hour or so before, I had used the Hangouts app and tried to verify my phone number. The first attempt failed, and for unrelated reasons I restarted the phone ...


4

Microsoft now no longer restricts password length for the Windows Live accounts unless you want to sign in to Xbox Live on the Xbox 360: I successfully set a 32 character password with a password manager, and signing in to Windows Live does not work unless I enter the full password, so it seems they are not limiting to the first 16 characters anymore.


4

I'm speculating here, but a couple of possibilities come to mind: you already had an active session with your Google account and signed in from the same IP address; it seems logical to assume it was you Did you copy your Firefox configuration to Opera? Did that include cookies? User agent? Google may have believed that you were using the same browser, ...


4

There is no way to change the link of a file in Google Drive, but you could create set expirations dates. For details see Set expiration dates for access to Google Drive, Docs, Sheets, and Slides files If you are using Google Apps for Work or other similar edition, share your files with people from the same domain, so when their accounts get suspended, they ...


4

... if it does store it Presumably you did not have to enter your phone number during this authentication stage? So, it must already have been "stored"? Or, if this was literally just a "prove you're human" step and you were required to enter your phone number, then I doubt that Google would store this phone number with the account. (?) Although I have not ...


4

This option is only available using a browser as documented in the 'Sign out of all sessions' of this article. I just tested and this option can be found in a mobile browser. I used Chrome on my Android phone. Start by going to mail.google.com. Select the menu icon on the left, scroll to the bottom, choose the Desktop link, then follow the same steps you ...


4

Actually this (called Risk-based authentication) is a very useful verification method since it prevents your Google account from being hacked by methods like phishing, keylogging etc. However, you can disable the feature in the Google Security Settings of your account (https://myaccount.google.com/security?pli=1#activity). When you're activating the feature ...


4

You can change password on Android, but it's incredibly hidden and very poor UX given how much they pour into the other parts of the app. Open the app on your device. Tap the hamburger menu (3 horizontal lines) in the upper left. Tap 'Settings' to go to your account settings. Where you see your name, number and email, tap that (it's a button!). Your ...


4

2-step verification (or 2-factor authentication) is a step above 1-factor authentication (just a password) because it requires the user to have access to something (generally, a specific cell phone) as well as know the password in order to log in to an account. However, 2-factor verification does not eliminate any security concerns. Researchers have shown ...


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