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Today, finally, I discovered a new search engine that doesn't ignore special characters: SymbolHound SymbolHound is a search engine that doesn't ignore special characters. This means you can easily search for symbols like &, %, and ^, or even less common characters such as ©, ¬, and µ. I'd like to share some information from their FAQ: Why ...


33

Solution Copy and paste the text below and change the word in the asterisks for your own needs: *bold*­ It will not be rendered as bold text when you post your Slack message. Note: There are hidden characters either side of the asterisks which will prevent Slack from formatting your word(s) between the asterisks. Explanation This is a variation of ...


18

I just tested and a single back-tick will escape upcoming formatting characters for the rest of the message. `*I don't want this to be bold*` That will be formatted as code `*I don't want this to be bold* That will be formatted normally but both asterisks will appear instead of making the text bold.


17

I think a better method is to use the 'nowiki' tag. This is generic and does not rely on knowing character codes, plus your text is more readable. <nowiki>*</nowiki> will display as an asterisk at the start of the sentence. http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Help:Formatting Now you can display any special characters you like!


16

You can use http://www.symbolhound.com [disclosure: I am a developer for the site] Unlike Google (even codesearch) SymbolHound includes special characters and symbols in a web search. ex: @#$%^&*()=+[]\ etc. You should be able to find results for += http://symbolhound.com/?q=%2B%3D The index is constantly growing, so each day the results will be more ...


13

UPDATE!: (2017-12-07) It seems Google has updated the Chrome web browser controls (and possibly others) to show placeholders for many common ASCII control characters, INCLUDING the Vertical Tab character! This change has caused my original Solution below to break, now showing "unknown character" squares or in some cases whitespace breaks, where before it ...


9

You enter it as &lowast; or as &#42;, which will be displayed as ∗ and *, respectively, in HTML. Here is a test: Here is displayed as a bullet list. ∗ Here is displayer as an asterisk operator (Math Asterisk). * Here is displayed as an asterisk. And your example: ∗Hello world, this sentence is not in an unordered list. or &#...


7

There is only one way to achieve what you want: Use a bot to create messages using the Slack API. Here's a page with an example showing how to do exactly what you want. But if you, the human, are typing using the Slack client, as others have said, there's no way to produce a string of text surrounded by asterisks. If you don't want other kinds of formatting ...


5

The general answer from Google is that you can't get Google to recognize symbols as literals in a search. There are a few special things symbols are used for (e.g. - to negate a word) and other than that they're ignored. It's unfortunate, but that's what seems to be for most search engines. SymbolHound is a search engine designed to fix this problem, but it ...


5

Use HTML entities style to insert special characters. For example writing &#955; will produce a λ See this Wikipedia page for the complete reference.


5

When creating websites, special characters need to be taken into extra consideration. HTML, the markup language used to write webpages, provides its own means of including special, non-"normal" characters. These characters include accent marks, special symbols, and more. The reason this is necessary is due to the nature of how webpage files are saved. In ...


4

Google does this now, see Improvements to searching for special characters in programming languages For those seeking answers to technical queries, Google just upped its search game. Now for queries containing sequences of 2-3 special characters such as [== vs ===] and [+=], Google will return results on the meaning of these sequences in programming ...


4

Just announced by Google, searching for special characters is greatly improved. The catch? You need to search for at least two or three characters. Now for queries containing sequences of 2-3 special characters such as [== vs ===] and [+=], Google will return results on the meaning of these sequences in programming languages. For example, if you’re ...


4

Actually, Google Sheets exports to CSV using UTF-8. In Excel, instead of using double-click to open a CSV file, use the Text Import Wizard as it allows to select the "File origin". On the "File Origin" field, select 65001: Unicode (UTF-8).


3

There is a Unicode character, "Combining Grapheme Joiner" (͏Unicode: U+034F, UTF-8: CD 8F) that, if inserted just before one of the special characters in Slack, somehow nerfs Slack's detection of the special characters: I don't want *this* to be bold              ^- Insert it before this asterisk This trick hack seems to escape the following character, ...


3

https://duckduckgo.com handled my search for "Redis::Queue" properly (not ignoring ::).


3

According to Google's Query Language Reference, string literals should be enclosed in either single or double quotes. Examples: "fourteen" 'hello world' "It's raining". You are joining the Attendance values by | only, which again is enclosed in 's, so if Attendance!A2:A was Larsson O'Malley Taylor the result of the "... '" & JOIN("|", Attendance!...


2

Use Google's Verbatim search to make Google not to interpret your search terms and do a search as it is. Search results based on Verbatim.


2

According to one report it appears that Google is now allowing for searches for punctuation. No word on exactly which punctuation is included (although a dozen or so were tested) and I don't see information on punctuation with text.


2

They are different characters (or partly non-character codepoints) that your browser cannot display due to lack of support in fonts in your system. It is common strategy in browsers to display a small rectangle containing the Unicode number in hexadecimal digits. You can use e.g. Fileformat.info Unicode Character Search or the Babelpad editor to find ...


2

I alternate between using Linux (mostly various flavours of Ubuntu on desktops) and MacOS; I often need to enter Swedish characters as I work there a lot. The way I handle it is to add an additional keyboard in the system settings, then I have an icon in the top menu bar of the main screen where I can select the keyboard I want to use. You can change it very ...


2

Maybe use the Unicode U+066D (٭) character when you mean the * character? The solution above in which the contributor recommends using the vertical tab character worked for me until I also included markup which used the .. syntax, at which point it did not.


1

To escape a special character, f.e. * or @, type the following characters right before the character that we want to escape: Keep pressed: <ctrl><shift> Press and release, one after the other, the following characters: u a d Release: <ctrl><shift> For a moment, we will see, underlined: uAD which will soon become invisible. Now ...


1

Another option is to double one of the asterisks. *cough** and **cough* both work for me in my testing.


1

Single back ticks will do it, triple back ticks will make it block text . . . but either will format it as code. As confirmed by this tweet by Slack. `*I don't want this to be bold*`


1

I use the Chrome browser, and I added the "Accents & Diacritics for Gmail" Extension. It's very easy to use. It adds a small blue and red icon toward the upper right, near the settings triple dot. You have to remember to reset it sometimes by opening Gmail in a browser tab, then click on the Extension icon, then select a language (like French) and click "...


1

As of October 2012, GMail includes its own multilingual options which may help here. If you tick "Enable input tools" under "Language" in Settings, you will be prompted to choose from a long list of languages and foreign keyboards. In your case, choose the French option with a keyboard symbol next to it. Once this option is enabled, you'll see an extra ...


1

If you can speak the language, you can use voice recognition. I personally use Dragon NaturallySpeaking when sending emails (French/English). It will take care of including non-English characters in Gmail.


1

insert, special characters, other European scripts, Greek. Choose Greek from the drop-down menu to the right side of the "European Scripts" box. It should show up. If you can see Greek when browsing Wikipedia you should be able to see it in Google Docs.


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