0

I have a Personal and Work account with Google. I use Google Docs to take notes, but every time I want to create a new document for work, it requires me to switch accounts. Gmail lets you access different inboxes by using different URLs. Is there anything like this for creating new docs?

migrated from superuser.com Oct 24 '17 at 21:44

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

2

On most Google websites (e.g. Google Docs, Google Drive, GMail...), there is a Query String (details on how to load the web page) that is usually authoriser=x or a number between two slashes (Like this: /0/.
Google Docs
The authoriser query string here is the 0 between the two slashes. When you open a new google website tab, the authoriser query string defaults to 0.
Now, if you change your google account to (for example) the second one in the list, the authoriser query string would than change to 1 (because computers usually start counting from 0).
However, there are some exceptions:

  • Google Groups (Well, actually it shows up before the page loads but the page is redirected so you can't see it in the URL)
  • Google AdSense (Advertisement for Google services)
  • Google Product Forums (Google help)
  • There might be more that I don't know off but these are just examples.



Now, back to your question, if your Personal account is the default google account, the authoriser query string would than be 0 but if your using your Work account (assuming it's not the default account), it's authoriser query string would be 1.
Therefore, if the authoriser query string in your bookmark is set to 0 (The link should look like this: www.docs.google.com/document/u/0/, it would automatically open up your Personal account but if it's equal to 1 (www.docs.google.com/document/u/1/), it would open up your Work account.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.