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I'm trying to find sentences of the following syntax (in French):

"Paris, une ville ancienne, est la".

Thus I typed the following into Google and Google Books: *, une * *, est la. Yet my search results (Click here for the link) don't produce this syntax/formula? What did I misconstrue?

I should elucidate that the *s can be any word; the first * doesn't have to be a city name, the second doesn't have to be about cities, the third doesn't have to be ancienne.

migrated from superuser.com Jan 26 '14 at 10:21

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You can’t search like that with commonly know web search engines, because they don’t support that. I’m sorry.

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Wildcards - @Robert is correct.

What you can do is to go to Google's french page - https://www.google.fr/ and there should be a similar one out of Montreal.. https://www.google.ca/?hl=fr

If you go to the right under "Settings" and Advanced Search, Google can help you construct a better search.

This may also be helpful for you as well as to what is allowed or what is not..

https://support.google.com/websearch/answer/136861?p=adv_operators&hl=en

For example, you do know that you can search UPS or FedEx Tracking Numbers or convert between U.S. and Metric terms, look for movies and there are bunch of "cool" things the Google team has incorporated in the search.

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The simplest approach would be to add phrases and drop any leading asterisks, e.g.,

"une" * * "est la"

A slightly more subtle version would be:

"une * * est la"

Or you can explore using the AROUND() filter, such as:

"une" AROUND(2) "est la"

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